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when working with the List class, i have noticed that the boolean i was looking for was:

 if(lstInts.Exists(x)){...}

X is a Predicate of T the same as lstInts. I was confused as to why you just cant pass int the int in this case, and why X's type isnt of type T.

Example i was testing:

List<int> listInt = new List<int>();
int akey = Convert.toInt32(myMatch.Value);
Predicate<int> pre = new Predicate<int>(akey);  //akey is not the correct constructor param.
if(listInt.Exists(pre)){
   listInt.add(akey);
}

Is there a reason for having the additional Step of Predicate, or.... if i am going about the logic incorrectly?

I also noticed that the predicate constructure does not take an item of type T. Sort of confused as to how this is suppose to work.

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use Contains method. –  Darren Kopp Sep 6 '12 at 19:22
    
very very uneful information. wow. –  Fallenreaper Sep 6 '12 at 19:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could also use Contains() method

List<int> listInt = new List<int>();
int akey = Convert.toInt32(myMatch.Value);

if(listInt.Contains(akey)){
  listInt.add(akey); 
}

Or alternately use Any()

if(listInt.Any(I => I == akey)) { 
  // Do your logic 
}
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Your contains answer ultimatly solves my issue i was having. haha –  Fallenreaper Sep 6 '12 at 19:28

Predicate<T> is a delegate (returning bool) that allows you to find an item matching some condition (that's why item being checked is passed into it ad an argument).

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This would be a good use for the HashSet<T> collection type, which does not allow duplicates (just silently ignores them).

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This may well be a better solution, although HashSet<T>.Add does return false if the item is already in the collection, so it isn't quite silent. –  Lee Sep 6 '12 at 19:28
    
Mmm, i might have to look into this as an alternative option. –  Fallenreaper Sep 6 '12 at 19:30
    
HashSet only works if Equals/GetHashCode has been overridden, so that is something to consider. –  Darren Kopp Sep 6 '12 at 19:35
    
For custom classes, yes you'll want to have a good Equals()/GetHashCode() override. For Int32, don't worry about it. –  Thomas G. Mayfield Sep 6 '12 at 19:42

Well, for your scenario, you should use the Contains method on the List class.

So what's the purpose of exists you might ask? Well, the Contains method uses the Equals method on the object to determine if the item you are checking is contained in the list or not. This only works if the class has overridden the Equals method for equality checking. If it hasn't, well then two separate instances of something that you consider to be equal will not be considered equal.

In addition to that, perhaps you want to use different logic that the Equals method provides. Now, the only way to determine if something is in the list is to either iterate it on your own, or write your own EqualityComparer to checks the equality of an instance.

So, what the list class does is expose some methods like Exists so that you can provide your own logic in an easy way, while doing the boilerplate iteration for you.

Example

Consider you have a list of Dog types. Now, the dog class has overridden the Equals method, so there is no way to check if a dog is equal to another, but they have some information about the dog like it's name and it's owner. So consider the following

List<Dog> dogs = new List<Dog> {
    new Dog { Name = "Fido", Owner = "Julie" },
    new Dog { Name = "Bruno", Owner = "Julie" },
    new Dog { Name = "Fido", Owner = "George" }
};

Dog fido = new Dog { Name = "Fido", Owner = "Julie" };
  • List.Contains(fido)
    • Returns false (since Equals method has not been overridden)
  • List.Exists(x => fido.Name == x.Name && fido.Owner == x.Owner)
    • Returns true since you are checking equality on the properties which, being strings, have equality overridden.

If you were to go look at the source code for the list class, you would likely see something like this.

public bool Exists(Predicate<Dog> predicate) {
    foreach (Dog item in Items) {
        if (predicate(item))
            return true;
    }

    return false;
}

Now, if you fill in the predicate I had above, the method would look like this

public bool Exists(Dog other) {
    foreach (Dog item in Items) {
        if (item.Name == other.Name && item.Owner == other.Owner)
            return true;
    }

    return false;
}
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