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I'm very familiar with using hash arguments to ActiveRecord queries, such as:

SomeModel.where(association_id: something.id, status: ACTIVE_STATUSES).exists?

and similar. But what if you want to do a simple NOT EQUAL or != or <> type condition? My simple case is just to exclude the current object from the query.

The only way I can think of would be this:

SomeModel.where("id != ?", self.id).where(association_id: something.id,...)

But this seems not very rails-like.

Is there a simpler way, or a way to include the != in the hash conditions?

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1  
Use this github.com/ernie/squeel gem for complex queries without hardcoded SQL-snippets. –  jdoe Sep 6 '12 at 20:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can either drop to the Arel table. There is a great (pro) Railscast on Arel. http://railscasts.com/episodes/355-hacking-with-arel

You could also use the Squeel gem.
http://erniemiller.org/projects/squeel/
http://railscasts.com/episodes/354-squeel

In Squeel:

SomeModel.where{ id != my_id }
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Some great alternatives there, thanks very much. –  trisweb Sep 10 '12 at 16:50

You are right, the only way to include != in a query is using

SomeModel.where("id != ?", self.id)

That aside, ActiveRecord converts other structures to the right SQL query like in:

where(:id => [1,2,3])

That will generate "where id in (1,2,3)" , but for != , > , < and such this is the only solution (although I'd be glad to discover otherwise)

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Even if it turns out it is the only way, I'd love to know for sure. Thanks! –  trisweb Sep 6 '12 at 19:43

Rails 4 has not:

SomeModel.where.not(id: self.id)
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Thank goodness. –  trisweb Oct 31 at 14:56

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