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So for a class we are having to make a hangman game that can take a user input for a word and then have another person solve for it. It has to be able to recognize multiple repeating letters in the word or I would be done. Below is my code, it works great until I remove the break statement in my checkformatch method so that it goes past the initial finding of a letter. With the break in there it never finds the second third etc repeated letters, without it, it returns that each letter that is not the letter searched is a miss and reduces my life count. What I'm needing is some hints on how to search my array for the letter that is inputted as a guess and return their index positions in the array without it thinking each character in the array that is not the one guessed is a wrong input. Thank you in advance.

package hangman;

import java.util.Scanner;

class Game {
int livesRemaining;
String letterGuessed;
String wordInput;
  char[] hiddenWord;
  char[] aOfWord ;

Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);
boolean isFound;
int a;


public Game()
{
    this.setLives(8);
    //this.output();

    System.out.println("Player 1 please enter the word to be searched: ");
    wordInput = input.nextLine();

    aOfWord = wordInput.toCharArray();

    hiddenWord = new char[aOfWord.length];

    for(int j = 0; j < hiddenWord.length; j++)
        hiddenWord[j] = '*';

    this.output();

    while(livesRemaining > 0)
    {
        System.out.println("Please choose a letter: ");
        letterGuessed = input.nextLine();

        this.checkForMatch(letterGuessed);
        if(isFound == true)
    {
        hiddenWord[a] = letterGuessed.charAt(0);
    }
    else
    {
        System.out.println("Is not found!");
        this.reduceLives();
    }
    this.output();


  }

}

public void setLives(int a)
{
    this.livesRemaining = a;
}

public void reduceLives()
{
    livesRemaining = livesRemaining -1;
    System.out.println("Lives remaining: " + this.getLives());

}

public int getLives()
{
    return livesRemaining;
}

public void output()
{
    System.out.println("Lives remaining: " + this.getLives());
    System.out.println("Word found so far ");

    for(int i = 0; i < hiddenWord.length; i++)
    {
        System.out.print(hiddenWord[i] + "\n");
    }

}

public void checkForMatch(String l)
{

    for(int i = 0; i < aOfWord.length; i++)
        {
            //System.out.println("Comparing " + l.charAt(0) + " To " + aOfWord[i]);
            if(l.charAt(0) == aOfWord[i])   
            { 
               isFound = true;
               a = i;
               break;
            }
            else
            {
                isFound = false;  
            } 
        }

}

}
share|improve this question

closed as too localized by templatetypedef, dasblinkenlight, martin clayton, PeeHaa, Graviton Sep 7 '12 at 1:57

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
what does the int a represent? Consider another name – Sednus Sep 6 '12 at 19:30
2  
you should never use names like a etc. give each of your variable names meaning. for example, public void setLives(int a) - the a could be something like remainingLives. A good example of where this causes confusion is checkForMatch(string l). The question would be easier to understand if l had a better name. In addition, it seems like you print System.out.println("Lives remaining: " + this.getLives()); twice - in reduceLives() and output() – tehdoommarine Sep 6 '12 at 19:34
    
basically a was just a variable i was using to store the position in the array that the letter was found at. I can change that name. – user519670 Sep 6 '12 at 19:42
1  
change the others, too. any variables or parameters that have one letter (except for the for loop counters) and make a vow to yourself to never use names like those again. it's really bad practice and makes the code a lot harder to understand; not just for others but for yourself as well – tehdoommarine Sep 6 '12 at 19:47
    
Will do, i can see the merit in it. I guess its time to start looking at little things like that in my code that will really make a difference. Thank you for the advice. – user519670 Sep 6 '12 at 19:52
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your algorithm seems fine. However, it will only get you the last matching character because a will be rewritten whenever he finds a matching character. I think a really simple solution would be to do this in your checkForMatch method:

if(l.charAt(0) == aOfWord[i])   
{ 
    isFound = true;
    hiddenWord[i] = l.charAt(0);
}

and also this in your game method...

if(!isFound)
{
    System.out.println("Is not found!");
    this.reduceLives();
}

You don't have to use this. by the way. That is only necessary in certain cases. Take a look at this.

share|improve this answer
    
Awesome! very simple solution and i like it. Placing the action of what to do in the actual if statement instead of having 2 if statements. I went with this solution, thank your for helping me solve this. – user519670 Sep 6 '12 at 19:49

To start with, if you want to return the indices of the chars, you'll need to add them somewhere, I would recommend returning an ArrayList which would hold all of your values. This is because an ArrayList can grow in size if it is too small and you'll not really need to worry about an out of bounds issue.

Your current form of checkForMatch works for what you want, but consider returning a boolean instead of setting your isFound field to true/false. Also there is a contains method that the String class has which you can call, so an alternative to your checkForMatch would be possible sort of like

String yourString = "Hello";
String yourChar = "e";
System.out.println(yourString.contains(yourChar));

Which of course would print true!

Now, to get the indices, you already traverse the array and compare characters in your checkForMatch() method, why not simply create an ArrayList<Integer> matchedIndices = new ArrayList<Integer>(); at the top of your method, and instead of setting isFound to true, call matchedIndices.add(i); if the characters match, and then at the end return the ArrayList?

You would of course have to swap your return type from void to ArrayList, but there are many ways to go about this, this being just the first that came to my head!

share|improve this answer
    
Now that is something i probably would not have thought of in a very long time. 2 semesters i took a data structures and algorithms class where we studied array lists, linked lists etc but i had completely forgot about this. Guess its time to refresh my memory and dust off that bood for a re-read. – user519670 Sep 6 '12 at 19:50

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