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Is it better to do:

const int MY_CONST = 20; // global constant in the program
class A {
    // uses MY_CONST all over the class implementation and definition
}

or this?

const int MY_CONST = 20; // global constant in the program
template<int my_const>
class A {
    //uses my_const only and never MY_CONST
};

//A<MY_CONST> used later in the program

Is one of these pattern better than the other? why? thanks

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3  
I think this depends on whether you have any need to change the constant on a per-template-instance basis. –  Kevin Ballard Sep 6 '12 at 20:08
1  
What would the benefit of the second approach? –  juanchopanza Sep 6 '12 at 20:09
2  
If you're just using the same one in every instance of the class and nowhere else, I'd prefer an in-class static const int MY_CONST = 20;. –  chris Sep 6 '12 at 20:12
1  
If you do decide on templates, a template<int my_const=MY_CONST> would probably be a good idea. –  KitsuneYMG Sep 6 '12 at 20:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The second solution is sensible if it makes sense to instantiate e.g. A<MY_CONST + 1>, or A<0>, or any other value than MY_CONST. If, however, A is strictly designed to be used with the one value, then you don't gain anything from that. In that respect the first solution gives you everything you need.

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Unless that global constant is used elsewhere outside of the class I would use neither of those approaches and make the constant a member of A:

class A {
public:
    static const int MY_CONST = 20;
};

const int A::MY_CONST; // Possibly need definition also

And then use A::MY_CONST in your code.

The only time I would use a template is when you need to change the value depending on the instance for some reason.

template <int I>
class A
{
public:
    static const int MY_CONST = I;
};

template <int I>
const int A<I>::MY_CONST; // Definition

Then create instances like so:

A<1> a1;
A<2> a2;
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One way to look at it is that you're introducing a dependency to A (only on a number, not on anything with behavior, but still that's a kind of dependency), and the question is whether to inject that dependency via a template parameter, or have the class pull in the dependency via a named const object.

I can see the template being useful for testing the class A -- you want to write the class to work with any value, so that you can change the value in future with confidence that you won't immediately get test failures and have to fix the bugs.

So, you could write the template and test it with lots of different values, even though no "real" program will use more than one instantiation of the template.

Obviously there are other ways to write a class whose behavior depends on an integer value, and test it. For example you could use a macro and have the test harness compile the code multiple times, or you could make MY_CONST an extern value and link the code against different object files containing different values, or you could make A store the value as a data member (even a static data member).

Which ones work for you depends how the class is going to use the value, but since a template parameter is an integer constant expression it's good for most uses that the const int is good for. You can't take a template parameter's address, is the only thing that immediately springs to mind.

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I would always remove the global variable. Let's distinguish 2 cases, MY_CONST is either

an implementation detail in which case I would prefer to make it a private constant

class A
{
private:
    static int const MY_CONST = 20;
};

or part of the class interface in which case I would prefer to make it a template parameter and provide it as a public member

template<int N>
class A
{
public:
    static int const MY_CONST = N;
};

This way, users can not only read but also "write" (at compile-time) to MY_CONST. If users will not want to specify anything but a default value for N, you could provide a default template argument, or give a simple typedef

typedef A<20> DefaultA;
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