Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Say I have the following code:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class Account
{
private:
    float balance;

public:
    Account() { balance = 0.0; };
    float GetBalance() { return balance; };
    void SetBalance(float newBalance) { balance = newBalance; };
};

Account mainAccount;

Account& GetAccount()
{
    return mainAccount;
}

void PrintAccountInfo()
{
    cout << "mainAccount's balance is " << mainAccount.GetBalance() << endl;
}

int main()
{
    PrintAccountInfo();
    Account &a = GetAccount(); // Line 31
    a.SetBalance(30.0);
    PrintAccountInfo();
    return 0;
}

When I run it, I get the following output (as expected):

mainAccount's balance is 0
mainAccount's balance is 30

However, on line 31, if I take out the "&" in the "Account &a", to make it this:

Account a = GetAccount(); // note lack of "&"

I get this output:

mainAccount's balance is 0
mainAccount's balance is 0

How come? I thought when returning a reference, the "&" is redundant / not necessary? Am I fundamentally misunderstanding how references work in C++?

EDIT: Thanks, I understand now why the two are different. However, then shouldn't I be able to do this:

Account GetAccount()
{
    return mainAccount;
}

int main()
{
    Account &a = GetAccount();
    // ....
}

However, when I run that, I get an error:

untitled: In function ‘int main()’:

untitled:31: error: invalid initialization of non-const reference of type ‘Account&’ from a temporary of type ‘Account’

share|improve this question
    
In one, you're copying the returned variable into a new one. In the other, you're initializing a reference with the returned variable. –  chris Sep 6 '12 at 20:22
2  
"I thought when returning a reference, the "&" is redundant" To the contrary, you return a reference by using "&". Otherwise you return a value (which will be a copy of what was returned). –  GManNickG Sep 6 '12 at 20:23

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I thought when returning a reference, the "&" is redundant / not necessary?

You thought wrong.

Consider these two different lines:

Account &a = GetAccount(); // Line 31

Account a = GetAccount(); // Line 31

In the first, you declare a reference called a which is bound to the object returned by the function GetAccount.

In the second, you declare an object a which is copy-initialized by the object returned by the function GetAccount.

Fundamentally: one declares a reference, the other declares an object.


EDIT: Answering the follow-on question:

"can I remove the & from the return type in the declaration of the GetAccount function: Account GetAccount() { return mainAccount; }"

You certainly can remove the &, but then your behavior will change. Consider these two functions:

Account GetAccount() { return mainAccount; }

Account &GetAccount() { return mainAccount; }

In the first, you return a temporary object which has been copy-initialized from the mainAccount object. In the second you return a reference to the mainAccount object.

  • If you want a to be a reference to mainAccount, you need & in both places.

  • If you want a to be a copy of mainAccount, you need no & in the declaration of a. The other declaration won't matter in this case.

  • If you want a to be a reference to a compiler-generated temporary value (hint: you don't), declare a with &, but GetAccount without.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. In that case, can I remove the & from the return type in the declaration of the GetAccount function: Account GetAccount() { return mainAccount; } –  user1516425 Sep 6 '12 at 20:35
    
Yes, you can, but you'll get a different program. See my edit. –  Robᵩ Sep 6 '12 at 20:57

In both cases you return a reference, but there is a difference in how you use it:

Account &a = GetAccount(); 

In this case you use the reference to initialize another reference, making a a reference to the original Data.

Account a = GetAccount(); 

In this case you use your returned reference to initialize an object of type Account, instead of a reference to Account. Therefore you copy the original object into the newly created a.

share|improve this answer

You return a reference, but you then create a new object using that reference. a is the new object that gets copy-initialized using the reference returned from GetAccount.

Remember, a reference is an alias. It's like saying:

int x = 0;
int& y = x;

int z = y;
//is equivalent to
z = x;

z doesn't refer to x nor y in this case, because z itself isn't a reference.

So:

x = 1;

would modify both x and y, but z would still be 0.

share|improve this answer

It does matter.

This version

Account a = GetAccount(); // note lack of "&"

creates a copy of the account, not a reference. Therefore when changing the balance, you change the balance of the copy, not the original.

share|improve this answer

To answer the question from the title: Not directly.

typedef Account& AccountRef; // Hiding here
AccountRef GetAccount()
{
    return mainAccount;
}

BTW, & isn't used as an operator here. It modifies the Account type. It can be used as an unary and binary operator, e.g. in &obj or 5 & 6. When used as an operator, it must appear before or between expressions.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.