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i want to know how and why Saxon uses whitespace in between XSL elements during XSLT. Here's an example that could be affected by the abovementioned behaviour:

How and why Saxon uses whitespace in between XSL elements during XSLT?

<div style="display:none;">
    <xsl:choose>
      <xsl:when test="true">
        <xsl:attribute name="id">
           <xsl:choose>
              <xsl:when>
               etc ec
              </xsl:when>
              <xsl:otherwise></xsl:otherwise>
            </xsl:choose>
          </xsl:attribute>
         </xsl:when>
         <xsl:otherwise></xsl:otherwise>

</div>

Why does whitespace between the <div and the <xsl:choose> can potentially cause the following error:

XSLT attribute node (id) cannot be created after the children of the containing element
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You're missing a closing tag for the first <xsl:choose> – Jim Garrison Sep 6 '12 at 22:49
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Text nodes containing nothing but whitespace (like the one in your example) have no effect (they are removed at a very early stage of parsing) UNLESS you happen to have the attribute xml:space="preserve" on some parent element in the stylesheet. (Putting xml:space="preserve" in a stylesheet is nearly always bad news, for reasons like this, but people do it from time to time and it could account for the problem here.)

The other possibility (I've only seen it once in 12 years...) is that the stuff that looks like whitespace isn't. For example it might contain a non-breaking space or a zero-width space, which look white but aren't officially whitespace.

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