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I have a very confusing situation:

I have a class that is compiled with line info on (verified using javap -l). This class gets loaded and instrumented with ASM. I verified that the correct class is loaded (i.e. not a stale class file from somewhere else). And I also made sure that the ASM flag ClassReader.SKIP_DEBUG is not set. Now if I call Thread.currentThread().getStackTrace(), I get StackTraceElements concerning this class that miss the line info. When debugging in Eclipse, the line info shows in the stack trace. I also made sure that the JVM is started with -Xint just to make sure the info is not erased as a optimization when the code is JIT compiled.

And most confusing: although all classes are loaded and instrumented the same, this is only true for some classes, not for all. This is the main reason, why I think this has got something to do with the JVM.

So my question is: does the JVM omit line info in the stack trace, if so when and how can I prevent this?

Edit: Just to make things clear: This is the class file of the source file I have in front of me, not of a 3rd party library. And as should be clear from above I tried hard to make sure the info is in the bytecode.

Edit: Now I even found an example where one StackTraceElement has line number info and another one hasn't and they are concerned with different methods from the same class!

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Do the classes with omitted line numbers have anything in common (same package/jar)? – TMN Sep 6 '12 at 20:35
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Are you doing the instrumenting? And if yes, are you updating the LineNumberTable to compensate for any bytecodes that you're adding? – parsifal Sep 6 '12 at 20:47
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I'm not familiar with ASM but can you somehow intercept its class loading and dump the byte array of the class before it's passed to defineClass()? – biziclop Sep 6 '12 at 20:55
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@roesslerj - the LineNumberTable attribute associates bytecode offsets with line numbers. I could imagine the JVM getting confused if the bytecode offset in the table doesn't correspond to the code that's being invoked (although I'd expect that it would just give the wrong line numbers). – parsifal Sep 6 '12 at 20:59
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My guess is that your changes and confusing the JVM in terms of how it determines the line number to associate with some code. – Peter Lawrey Sep 7 '12 at 7:06
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm wondering if the lines reported (or not, as it were) in your stack trace were generated when ASM instrumented your classes. Since they were modified post-compile, any line numbers wouldn't appear in the class file, so they wouldn't be available to the class loader (or be reportable by javap). I don't have a lot of experience with run-time code generation, so it's just a guess, but maybe it's something you could consider.

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You are right. One can have as many BytecodeInstructions in one line as one wishes (one can write HelloWorld in 1 line), which is why I didn't take care. But ASM has LineNumberNodes as pseudo BytecodeInstructions and if the code is added before the first LineNumberNode, then the regenerated LineNumberTable starts only after the generated code, so the added code is essentially without line number info. – roesslerj Sep 7 '12 at 7:12

This has to do with how the class file was compiled. Have a peek here:

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/tooldocs/windows/javac.html

and look for the "debugging information" around the -g flag. If you add -g, your code will contain line numbers (and a lot of other useful information).

This won't retroactively add debug information to 3rd party libraries, I'm afraid. You'll have to see about getting the source, or getting debug builds from the vendor. I've found that this is usually not necessary.

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I am sorry I wasn't clear enough. I am not talking about anybody else's code, but the very code I have in front of me and try to debug. And I tried very hard to make sure the information is available in the bytecode... – roesslerj Sep 6 '12 at 20:42
    
You must add -g to the javac when compiling your project. – PaulProgrammer Sep 6 '12 at 23:13

Not all line numbers are available in the JVM. Some third party libraries may be compiled without line numbers, particularly non-open-source ones, and even some Java classes have protected source code that's doing encryption or some other protected logic. In short, not everything will always have line numbers.

share|improve this answer
    
I am sorry I wasn't clear enough. I am not talking about anybody else's code, but the very code I have in front of me and try to debug. And I tried very hard to make sure the information is available in the bytecode... – roesslerj Sep 6 '12 at 20:37

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