Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

For a long time, I used simple char[] buffer when reading and writing files.

Let's assume I have a very simple function like:

int f(int fd_in, int fd_out)
{
    char buf[4096];
    char* bufp = buf;
    ssize_t ret, wr;

    ret = read(fd_in, buf, sizeof(buf));
    /* ... */

    while (ret > 0)
    {
        wr = write(fd_out, bufp, ret);
        /* ... */
    }

    return wr;
}

Now, that I'm a bit more aware of alignment issues, I'm starting to think this will actually be suboptimal because the buffer will be aligned for char.

Does it seem reasonable to use a different (larger) integral type for buffer in order to obtain a 'stronger' alignment? Will it make reads/writes more optimal? How far do the benefits go? Is using posix_memalign to get even more alignment than integral types can achieve a better solution?

share|improve this question
    
No, why? If you are reading bytes, char or unsigned char works well. – Bo Persson Sep 6 '12 at 20:58
    
I am reading the whole buffer, and writing the whole buffer (hopefully). I just thought that the underlying implementation could actually optimize the read to larger chunks if the buffer was aligned properly. – Michał Górny Sep 6 '12 at 21:04
    
We are likely using virtual memory in the program, while the disk I/O works on physical memory. Just trust the OS to handle this properly! – Bo Persson Sep 6 '12 at 21:07
    
Yes, the OS will just read into its own buffers. But then there's the performance of copying the data from them into my buffer and back… well, unless the virtual memory will magically handle that as well. – Michał Górny Sep 6 '12 at 21:14
    
1) don't over-estimate the cost of memcpy(). 2) the 4096 sized buffers span multiple cache slots (64 byte size, IIRC). 3) The OS has its own buffers, too. 4) on a partial read+write you are screwed anyway. 5) the cost of two system calls (read+write) is much higher than the memcpy's (aligned or unaligned) 6) (in Linux) there is a in-kernel bufferless function for this (copyfd, or such), implemented as a systemcall. 6) you could always try to measure the difference: int buff[4096 / sizeof(int)]; would at least be int-aligned. – wildplasser Sep 6 '12 at 21:58
up vote 3 down vote accepted
  • don't over-estimate the cost of memcpy(). On current machines, memcpy runs "faster than the bus", and spends a lot of its time waiting for cache slots to be pulled in.
  • the 4096-sized buffers span multiple cache slots (64 byte size, IIRC).
  • The OS has its own buffers, too. (the chunks have to be copied from network buffers, or from DMA memory, for disk)
  • on a partial read+write, you are screwed anyway. Your code is prepared to recieve and send 13 bytes. or 133 or 1333. Or 4095. Or 4096. In most cases, the next read/write will not be aligned nicely. The good news: for diskfiles, the size will probably be a multiple of 512, anyway.
  • the cost of two system calls (read+write) is much higher than the memcpy's (aligned or unaligned) (there is a nice table of estimated costs inside the cover of the Gray&Reuter book. maybe a bit outdated, but still very instructive)
  • (in Linux) there is a in-kernel bufferless function for this (copyfd, or such) UPDATE : sendfile() is the name, implemented as a systemcall.
  • you could always try to measure the difference: int buff[4096 / sizeof(int)]; would at least be int-aligned. Best way would be to use an union of an int array and a char array. Unions are always aligned to the requirements of the pickyest member.
share|improve this answer
    
Hm, why the union? Unless I'm missing something, it should be perfectly valid to cast int[] to char*, doesn't it? – Michał Górny Sep 7 '12 at 7:32
    
Yes, there is nothing wrong with that. But the union would avoid the cast, and might look cleaner. – wildplasser Sep 7 '12 at 7:54
    
Well, I've just started preparing the measure and gcc doesn't allow me to set stack alignment below 16 bytes ;). – Michał Górny Sep 7 '12 at 8:14

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.