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Consider this minimal example:

#include <array>
struct X {
  std::array<int,2> a;
  X(int i, int j) : a(std::array<int,2>{{i,j}}) {}
  //                 ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^       ^
};

According to other posts I shouldn't have to explicitly construct a temporary in this situation. I should be able to write:

  X(int i, int j) : a{{i,j}} {}

but this and several other (similar) versions I tried are all refused by my (admittedly quite old) g++ 4.5.2. I currently have only that one for experimentation. It says:

error: could not convert ‘{{i, j}}’ to ‘std::array<int, 2ul>’

Is this a limitation of this compiler implementation or what's going on?

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2  
That's not a compound literal; C++ doesn't even have them! –  eq- Sep 6 '12 at 21:06
4  
Yes, your outdated GCC is the issue -- works fine with 4.7.1. –  ildjarn Sep 6 '12 at 21:08
    
I'd assumed he was talking about multicharacter literals, but there's none of those in this question either. –  Mooing Duck Sep 6 '12 at 21:09
    
Yep, that's why C++ syntax and semantics are driving me nuts. Agreed to Mr Torvalds. –  user529758 Sep 6 '12 at 21:09
    
@eq-: It's not? Then it's a proper constructor? What do we call this, then. It is the default constructor to a temporary; Maybe there's a name for it. –  bitmask Sep 6 '12 at 21:09
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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The problem is, as a lot of times, the compiler version. The following code works fine with GCC 4.7.1:

#include <array>

struct X{
  std::array<int, 2> a;
  X() : a{{1,2}} {}
};

int main(){
  X x;
}

Live example.

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This was answered in the comments by ildjam. –  Matt Phillips Sep 6 '12 at 21:57
4  
@MattPhillips: Okay, and because I wrote my answer at the same time, I get a downvote? Sorry that I was a little bit slower with typing. Also, a question needs an answer to accept, not just a comment. –  Xeo Sep 6 '12 at 22:00
    
Just got to your comment now, sorry about that Xeo. I should have looked at the timestamps and now my downvote is locked. FWIW I made it up to you elsewhere. :) –  Matt Phillips Sep 7 '12 at 0:35
1  
@MattPhillips: You can make a stealth edit (as I just did, just removing / adding some whitespace) to make it unlocked again, for future reference. :) –  Xeo Sep 7 '12 at 4:40
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