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I'm writing a script that will dynamically update forum pages for me. Not only is this convenient, but I figure it's a good exercise to get more acquainted with Javascript and DOM.

To get an updated list of posts, I have to fetch the latest version of the page. I'm doing that with XmlHttpRequest:

function getNewDOM(url) {
    console.log("getNewDOM()");
    // Get the page
    var request = new XMLHttpRequest();
    request.open("GET", url, false);
    request.send(null);  

    var new_html = request.responseText;
    var new_dom = document.createElement("div");
    // Strip the HTML down to the contents of the <body> tag.
    new_html = new_html.replace(/<!DOCTYPE.*?body\ id.*?>/, "");
    new_html = new_html.replace(/\/body>.*?<\/html>/, "");
    console.log("Strip HTML");
    new_dom.innerHTML = new_html;

    return new_dom;

}

As you can see, the request is currently synchronous. For reasons I'm sure you all know, this is bad. Using an asynchronous request doesn't get the job done, since the rest of the code begins executing before the page is finished downloading.

I think setTimeout() is what I need to be using. Something like this?

function getNewDOM(url) {
    console.log("getNewDOM()");
    // Get the page
    var request = new XMLHttpRequest();
    request.open("GET", url, true);
    request.send(null);  

    setTimeout(function() {

        var new_html = request.responseText;
        var new_dom = document.createElement("div");
        // Strip the HTML down to the contents of the <body> tag.
        new_html = new_html.replace(/<!DOCTYPE.*?body\ id.*?>/, "");
        new_html = new_html.replace(/\/body>.*?<\/html>/, "");
        console.log("Strip HTML");
        new_dom.innerHTML = new_html;

        return new_dom;

    }, 15000);

}

Problem is that I don't know a way to get that return value back to the original getNewDOM() function so that I can return it there. And even if I did, wouldn't it just wind up returning some undefined value in getNewDOM(), since the function in the timeout won't run until after getNewDOM() completes? And that would still leave me in the situation I'm in now.

I'm completely new to AJAX. I understand that there may be some simple ways to do with with jQuery, but I'd like to do it with vanilla Javascript if at all possible.

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2 Answers 2

I think setTimeout() is what I need to be using

No, because you never know when the async ajax request will be finished. What you need is to bind to the readystatechange event:

var request = new XMLHttpRequest();
request.onreadystatechange = function() {
    if (request.readyState==4 && request.status==200) {
        // Inside here is the only safe place to use request.responseText;
    }
}
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Instead of waiting 15 seconds you should use the readystatechange event

request.onreadystatechange = function() {
    if (request.readyState === 4 && request.status === 200) {
        // code which should be executed once the download has finished
        // ...
    }
}
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That's another thing I tried. But, I still can't get the return value back to getNewDOM() that way, can I? Wouldn't it still end the function with an undefined value, since the function will end before the state changes? –  user1653251 Sep 6 '12 at 22:15
    
Any code what needs the response of the Ajax call has to be moved into the readystatechange handler or at least the code has to be called there so you can pass the response to it –  Andreas Sep 6 '12 at 22:17
    
So, you're saying I'd need to break up the function that calls getNewDOM() into multiple parts, such that the latter portion is called from getNewDOM() (or, rather, the onreadystatechange handler)? –  user1653251 Sep 6 '12 at 22:18
    
You're right :) –  Andreas Sep 6 '12 at 22:21
    
Well, that means I have to rewrite the entire script, more or less. But, thanks! At least I know what I'm doing now. –  user1653251 Sep 6 '12 at 22:22
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