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I am trying to use f2py to run a simple integration problem in 3 dimensions.

The python code which calls the fortran code is as follows:

#!/Library/Frameworks/EPD64.framework/Versions/Current/bin/python
import pymods as modules
import pygauleg as gauleg
import pyint as integrator
import pylab as pl
import sys
import math
import time

############################################
# main routine #############################
############################################
zero = 0.0
one = 1.0
pi = pl.pi

Nr = 10
Nt = 10
Np = 2*Nt
r0 = zero
rf = one
NNang = Nr*Nt*Np

print 'Nr Nt Np = ', Nr, Nt, Np
print 'NNang = ', NNang
print 'r0 rf = ', r0, rf

Nx = int(math.floor( (one*NNang)**(one/3.0) ))
Ny = int(math.floor( (one*NNang)**(one/3.0) ))
Nz = int(math.floor( (one*NNang)**(one/3.0) ))

Nx = int(pl.floor(float(Nx)*1.75))
Ny = int(pl.floor(float(Ny)*1.75))
Nz = int(pl.floor(float(Nz)*1.75))

NNxyz = Nx*Ny*Nz


print 'Nx Ny Nz = ', Nx, Ny, Nz
print 'NNxyz = ', NNxyz
xyz0 = -rf
xyzf = rf

t1 = time.time()
xt = pl.zeros(Nt)
wt = pl.zeros(Nt)
gauleg.gauleg(xt, wt, 0.0, pl.pi, Nt)
print 'outside of gauleg'

While the fortran subroutine is a bit lengthy, the important parts of it are the beginning ...

  2 subroutine gauleg(x,w,x1,x2,n)
  3 !Input:   x1,x2,n
  4 !Output:  x,w
  5 !implicit none
  6 !integer, parameter :: ikind = selected_int_kind(25)
  7 !integer, parameter :: rkind = selected_real_kind(15, 307)
  8 !
  9 !real(kind = rkind), parameter :: pi = 3.14159265358979323846d00
 10 !real(kind = rkind), parameter :: one = 1.0d00
 11 !real(kind = rkind), parameter :: zero = 0.0d00
 12 use mod_gvars
 13 
 14 real(kind = rkind) :: tol = 1d-15
 15 
 17 integer :: n
 18 !!!!!f2py intent(in) n
 19 real(kind = rkind), dimension(n) :: x
 20 real(kind = rkind), dimension(n) :: w
 22 real :: x1, x2
 23 
 24 real(kind = rkind) :: z1, z, xm, xl, pp, p3, p2, p1;
 25 
 26 integer(kind = ikind) :: m
 27 integer(kind = ikind) :: i,j
 28 integer(kind = ikind) :: countmax, counter, max_counter, min_counter
 29 
 30 integer(kind = ikind) :: tenth, hundredth, thousandth
 31 
 32 print*, 'n = ', n

and the end ...

 98 
 99 print*, 'returning'
100 
101 end subroutine

The comments at the top of the subroutine (lines 5 - 11) are structures which exist in the fortran module mod_gvars. It seems like everything is going according to plan *until* this subroutine returns. Here is the output:

Nr Nt Np =  10 10 20
NNang =  2000
r0 rf =  0.0 1.0
Nx Ny Nz =  21 21 21
NNxyz =  1728
 n =           10
 m =  5
 returning
python(14167) malloc: *** error for object 0x1081f77a8: incorrect checksum for freed object - object was probably modified after being freed.
*** set a breakpoint in malloc_error_break to debug
Abort trap

It seems like the subroutine runs into a problem only upon returning. Why would this happen?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

This kind of problem typically happens with a reference count error in Python, which might happen for example if there is a bug in f2py, or if you overwrite more memory in Fortran than is allocated in the numpy arrays. All these errors only show after the Fortran subroutine exits, at a random point, typically when you deallocate some memory in Python.

To debug this, try to print all the arrays that you get into Fortran, that is, print the arrays x, w, to make sure that you can access all the memory in there (testing that f2py used the same types and so on).

Make sure you use bounds checking in Fortran (at least -fbounds-check in gfortran, preferably just -fcheck=all to check all problems).

You can also run this under debugger or valgrind, it might tell you where the problem is.

Finally, I personally prefer to just use Cython to wrap Fortran directly. Then I have easy access to all the generated files and I use the iso_c_binding Fortran module so that the Fortran compiler checks that all types are compatible between Fortran and C (Python), see here for an example.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for interesting suggestion for other possibility of interfacing to Fortran. However, sometimes one might assumed shape arrays, keyword arguments and other features possible with an explicit interface. –  Vladimir F Sep 7 '12 at 8:35

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