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Assume I have a type Aggregator and one Aggregatee. The former knows a collection of the latter by shared_ptrs. The latter has a unique back pointer to the former:

struct Aggregatee {
  private:
    Aggregator& aggregator;
    Aggregatee(Aggregator& aggregator)
      : aggregator{aggregator} {
      // PROBLEM HERE:
      //   I want to put `this` into the aggregation list,
      //   but I have no clue how to properly refer to `this`
      //   because I don't have the smart pointer object, yet.
    }
    Aggregatee(Aggregatee const& from) { /* ... */ }
  public:
    template <typename Args...>
    static std::shared_ptr<Aggregatee> create(Args... args) {
      return std::make_shared<Aggregatee>(args...);
    }
};

struct Aggregator {
  std::set<std::shared_ptr<Aggregatee>> aggregation;
};

Obviously I can defer registering the Aggregatee in the Aggregator object after make_shared with a private register function, but it smells like two-phase as the object is temporarily inconsistently initialised.

Is there any known solution to this?

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3 Answers 3

Depending on your application, you could move the static create method from Aggregatee to a regular member method Aggregator. Then you can create the shared_ptr and store it in the same method.

This assumes that an Aggregatee is always associated with an Aggregator.

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Yes, but it is far more intuitive to construct an Aggregatee (note that I'm aggregating, not composing!). Besides, this is a simplification, as there are actually two separate types Aggregator1 and Aggregator2 with the properties of the original post. So, an Aggregatee is at all times associated with exactly one Aggregator but not exclusively -- it is also associated with objects of a different type. If this was a composition your approach would work. –  bitmask Sep 7 '12 at 2:06

What you are trying to avoid is actually a quite common pattern: the aggregator (container) is created, then aggregatees (elements) are created and inserted into the container. The element can be created with the back pointer passed to the constructor, and then inserted into the container, or the backpointer.

Consider for example a binary tree with backpointers, the elements are created at the leaves with pointers to the parent node, and the pointer is immediately stored in the parent node.

As to your particular question, it cannot be done, as you cannot get a shared_ptr to an object before the object is created, not even with enable_shared_from_this.

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You could use an intrusive shared pointer. Since the reference count then lives inside the shared object, the Aggregatee can create a shared pointer to itself inside its own constructor.

Boost has an example of an intrusive pointer type, or you can roll your own quite easily.

http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_51_0/libs/smart_ptr/intrusive_ptr.html

// shared base type contains the reference counter; how you implement the
// reference counting depends on your implementation.
struct Aggregatee : public shared {
  private:
    Aggregator& aggregator;

    Aggregatee(Aggregator& aggregator) : aggregator{aggregator} {
      // Boost allows a raw pointer to be implicitly cast to an intrusive
      // pointer, but maybe your intrusive pointer type won't.
      aggregator.aggregation.insert(intrusive_ptr<Aggregatee>(this));
    }

    Aggregatee(Aggregatee const& from) { /* ... */ }

  public:
    template <typename Args...>
    static intrusive_ptr<Aggregatee> create(Args... args) {
      return new intrusive_ptr<Aggregatee>(args...);
    }
};

struct Aggregator {
  std::set<intrusive_ptr<Aggregatee>> aggregation;
};

One thing you have to be mindful of is that the Aggregatee is indeed stored in a smart pointer after construction.

Aggregatee aggregatee(aggregator);  // Very bad!
intrusive_ptr<Aggregatee> aggregatee(new Aggregatee(aggregator));  // Good

Also, you'd better be damned sure that your Aggregator holds onto the intrusive_ptr until the Aggregatee is fully constructed, otherwise the Aggregatee will end up being destroyed before the constructor exits!

So there are some caveats that come with this approach, but as far as I am aware, this is the closest you are going to get to achieving what you have asked for.

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