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I am trying to implement simple validation of credit card numbers. I read about the Luhn algorithm on Wikipedia:

  1. Counting from the check digit, which is the rightmost, and moving left, double the value of every second digit.
  2. Sum the digits of the products (e.g., 10: 1 + 0 = 1, 14: 1 + 4 = 5) together with the undoubled digits from the original number.
  3. If the total modulo 10 is equal to 0 (if the total ends in zero) then the number is valid according to the Luhn formula; else it is not valid.

On Wikipedia, the description of the Luhn algorithm is very easily understood. However, I have also seen other implementations of the Luhn algorithm on Rosetta Code and elsewhere.

Those implementations work very well, but I am confused about why they can use an array to do the work. The array they use seems to have no relation with Luhn algorithm, and I can't see how they achieve the steps described on Wikipedia.

Why are they using arrays? What is the significance of them, and how are they used to implement the algorithm as described by Wikipedia?

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Your question is a bit unclear. Can you explain what you're asking again? –  Blender Sep 7 '12 at 2:18
    
I have updated the question. –  Mithril Sep 7 '12 at 2:25
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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

the array [0,1,2,3,4,-4,-3,-2,-1,0] is used as a look up array for finding the difference between a number in 0-9 and the digit sum of 2 times its value. For example, for number 8, the difference between 8 and (2*8) = 16 -> 1+6 = 7 is 7-8 = -1.

Here is graphical presentation, where {n} stand for sum of digit of n

[{0*2}-0, {1*2}-1, {2*2}-2, {3*2}-3, {4*2}-4, {5*2}-5, {6*2}-6, {7*2}-7....]
   |       |        |         |        |        |       |         |  
[  0  ,    1    ,   2    ,    3  ,     4   ,   -4  ,   -3   ,    -2  ....] 

The algorithm you listed just sum over all the digit and for each even spot digit, look up the the difference using the array, and apply it to the total sum.

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I get it!Thank you very much. –  Mithril Sep 7 '12 at 3:27
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Unfortunately none of the codes above worked for me. But I found on GibHub a working solution

// takes the form field value and returns true on valid number
function valid_credit_card(value) {
// accept only digits, dashes or spaces
    if (/[^0-9-\s]+/.test(value)) return false;

// The Luhn Algorithm. It's so pretty.
    var nCheck = 0, nDigit = 0, bEven = false;
    value = value.replace(/\D/g, "");

    for (var n = value.length - 1; n >= 0; n--) {
        var cDigit = value.charAt(n),
            nDigit = parseInt(cDigit, 10);

        if (bEven) {
            if ((nDigit *= 2) > 9) nDigit -= 9;
        }

        nCheck += nDigit;
        bEven = !bEven;
    }

    return (nCheck % 10) == 0;
}
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Compact Luhn validator:

var luhn_validate = function(imei){
    return !/^\d+$/.test(imei) || (imei.split('').reduce(function(sum, d, n){ 
            return n===(imei.length-1)
                   ? 0 
                   : sum + parseInt((n%2)? d: [0,2,4,6,8,1,3,5,7,9][d]);
        }, 0)) % 10 == 0;
};

Works fine for both CC and IMEI numbers. Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/8VqpN/

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This doesn't work for my VISA. –  rg89 Oct 23 '13 at 20:24
    
Now works fine, sorry –  kolypto Nov 22 '13 at 10:47
1  
Beware: This implementation still doesn't work with some cards taken from Paypal's list of valid test credit cards: paypalobjects.com/en_US/vhelp/paypalmanager_help/… –  Jonathan Dumaine Feb 12 at 17:10
    
@JonathanDumaine, thanks for your bug report! A small fix was made, and the function is finally 100% working. –  kolypto Feb 15 at 1:21
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Code is the following:

var LuhnCheck = (function()
{
    var luhnArr = [0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 1, 3, 5, 7, 9];
    return function(str)
    {
        var counter = 0;
        var incNum;
        var odd = false;
        var temp = String(str).replace(/[^\d]/g, "");
        if ( temp.length == 0)
            return false;
        for (var i = temp.length-1; i >= 0; --i)
        {
            incNum = parseInt(temp.charAt(i), 10);
            counter += (odd = !odd)? incNum : luhnArr[incNum];
        }
        return (counter%10 == 0);
    }
})();

The variable counter is the sum of all the digit in odd positions, plus the double of the digits in even positions, when the double exceeds 10 we add the two numbers that make it (ex: 6 * 2 -> 12 -> 1 + 2 = 3)

The Array you are asking about is the result of all the possible doubles

var luhnArr = [0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 1, 3, 5, 7, 9];

  • 0 * 2 = 0 --> 0
  • 1 * 2 = 2 --> 2
  • 2 * 2 = 4 --> 4
  • 3 * 2 = 6 --> 6
  • 4 * 2 = 8 --> 8
  • 5 * 2 = 10 --> 1+0 --> 1
  • 6 * 2 = 12 --> 1+2 --> 3
  • 7 * 2 = 14 --> 1+4 --> 5
  • 8 * 2 = 16 --> 1+6 --> 7
  • 9 * 2 = 18 --> 1+8 --> 9

So for example

luhnArr[3] --> 6 (6 is in 3rd position of the array, and also 3 * 2 = 6)
luhnArr[7] --> 5 (5 is in 7th position of the array, and also 7 * 2 = 14 -> 5 )
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If you want to calculate the checksum, this code from this page is very concise and in my random tests seems to work.

NOTE: the verification algorithmns on this page do NOT all work.

// Javascript
String.prototype.luhnGet = function()
{
    var luhnArr = [[0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9],[0,2,4,6,8,1,3,5,7,9]], sum = 0;
    this.replace(/\D+/g,"").replace(/[\d]/g, function(c, p, o){
        sum += luhnArr[ (o.length-p)&1 ][ parseInt(c,10) ]
    });
    return this + ((10 - sum%10)%10);
};

alert("54511187504546384725".luhnGet());​

Here's my findings for C#

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I trust that that code works correctly, but the question was asking why arrays can be used in the validation and how the values in the arrays relate to the algorithm. Perhaps you could edit your answer to include the reason why you're using an array and how it works? –  icktoofay Jun 25 '13 at 4:16
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