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Parent.h (extends NSObject) like this:

@implementation InTParent

-(id)init
{
    NSLog(@"Parent init method");
    if (self = [super init]) {
        ;
    }
    return self;
}


-(id)initWithName:(NSString*)name;
{
    NSLog(@"Parent initWithName method");
    if (self = [self init]) {
        ;
    } 
    return self;
}

Son.h(extends Parent) like this:

@implementation InTSon

-(id)init
{
    NSLog(@"Son init method");
    if (self = [super init]) {
        ;
    }
    return self;
}

-(id)initWithName:(NSString*)name;
{
    NSLog(@"Son initWithName method");
    if (self = [super initWithName:name]) {
        ;
    }
    return self;
}

I use this: IntSon *_son = [[IntSon alloc] initWithName:@"asd"];

why the output is: Son initWithName method --> Parent initWithName method --> Son init method --> Parent init method

But in Java,it perhaps like this : Son initWithName method --> Parent initWithName method --> Parent init method

Please help me!

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3 Answers 3

To understand this behavior, you have to understand how Objective-C message dispatching works. And this is a good example to illustrate it.

At a high level, any time you call a method on any object, the Objective-C runtime looks for the implementation provided the most-derived (deepest in the class hierarchy) class. If it doesn't find it, it will go the next most-derived, and so on all they way up to NSObject. The first time it finds an implementation matching the selector (method name, roughly), it will execute that implementation. When you call super, you are specifying to send a message to the next most-derived class's implementation of that method.

So in your code, you call alloc on the InTSon class, which returns an instance of IntSon with the isa pointer set to the class object InTSon. The isa pointer is how method implementations are looked for during the process of ascending the class hierarchy.

So after you have an InTSon instance, you call initWithName: on it, and it checks the class pointed to by isa (which is InTSon for an implementation of this method. It finds it, so executes it, resulting in your first output:

"Son initWithName method"

Immediately afterward, you call the superclass implementation of that method, which looks in InTParent for its implementation of initWithName: and executes that code, resulting in your second output:

Parent initWithName method

Now here is where you see a deviation from Java - you call init on self. self, however, is a pointer to an InTSon instance. So when the runtime resolves this message, it looks first for the implementation of init in the InTSon class. Of course, it finds it, and executes the code for that method, which gives you your third output, Son init method. Next you call super, which looks up and executes the InTParent implementation of init, and gives you your final output.

To sum up, regardless of where in the class hierarchy a method is called from, if it's called on self, it will always execute the most derived implementation of that method. Hope this helps, and if you have any questions please let me know!

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+1 for very detailed explanation! –  Alexander of Norway Sep 7 '12 at 3:05
    
Thanks very much!!! –  Swu_Log Sep 7 '12 at 12:15
    
@Swu_Log you're welcome! Did this help you out or do you still need more help? –  Carl Veazey Sep 8 '12 at 22:35
    
Yes,thanks a lot, not a english mothortoungue people,so I am trying my best to understand it! –  Swu_Log Sep 9 '12 at 5:39
    
@Swu_Log cool let me know if you need more help to accept the answer :) –  Carl Veazey Sep 13 '12 at 15:12

Your class diagram looks like this:

class diagram

When you send the initWithName: message to your instance of InTSon, the system looks up the method in InTSon's method table, and finds the method that we call -[InTSon initWithName:]. That method, simplified, looks like this:

// -[InTSon initWithName:]
- (id)initWithName:(NSString *)name {
    return [super initWithName:name];
}

This method does [super initWithName:name]. Because it sends the message to super, the system looks in the method table of the superclass of self's class. Your object's class is InTSon, and its superclass is InTParent. So when -[InTSon initWithName:] does [super initWithName:name], the system looks for the method in InTParent's method table. It finds the method that we call -[InTParent initWithName:]. That method, simplified, looks like this:

// -[InTParent initWithName:]
- (id)initWithName:(NSString *)name {
    return [self init];
}

This method does [self init]. Because it sends the message to self, the system looks in the method table for self's class. Even though we are in -[InTParent initWithName:], self is still an instance of the InTSon class. So the system looks for an init method in InTSon's method table. It finds the method we call -[InTSon init]. That method, simplified, looks like this:

// -[InTSon init]
- (id)init {
    return [super initWithName:@"sdas"];
}

This method does [super initWithName:], so the system looks in the superclass's (InTParent's) method table and finds the -[InTParent initWithName:] method. And as we have just seen, -[InTParent initWithName:] ends up calling [InTSon init]. So we get infinite recursion and the app crashes.

To solve this problem, you need to pick one of InTParent's init methods as its designated initializer. You should read about designated initializers in Apple's documentation.

You should pick the initWithName: method as InTParent's designated initializer. This method must not send any init message to self. It should only send super's designated initializer message (which in the case of NSObject is the init message), and it should send it to super. So you need to write the -[InTParent initWithName:] method like this:

- (id)initWithName:(NSString *)name {
    // init is NSObject's designated initializer, and we send it to super.
    if ((self = [super init])) {
        // your initialization code here
    }
    return self;
}

By picking a designated initializer, and making your designated initializer only send the superclass's designated initializer message to super, you prevent the infinite recursion.

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Thanks very much!!! I think "self is still an instance of the InTSon class. " works! –  Swu_Log Sep 7 '12 at 12:15

Because "self" is a "InTSon", so [self init] calls the "InTSon" init method.

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