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I've done some searching (maybe I'm not describing my problem well enough) but haven't been able to find an answer for this

Let's say you have the following POCO:

public class StandardObject
{
   public string A {get;set;}
   public string B {get;set;}
}

Somewhere else in the program there is some logic to handle StandardObjects. There exists a case where sometimes a StandardObject may need to be handled differently. We know this when we create the StandardObject however none of the current properties can be used to determine this further down the chain. One approach would be to add and set a flag or type enum on StandardObject and check this when handling the objects. E.G.

if(standardObject.IsSpecial){...}

if(standardObject.ObjectType == StandardObjectTypeEnum.Special){...}

This doesn't seem like the best approach though.

The other option would be to create a derived class:

public class SpecialObject : StandardObject { }

So now rather than checking a property, we can check the type. E.G.

if(standardObject.GetType() == typeof(SpecialObject)){...}

(Depending on what we were doing, the type checking might be implemented differently)

Note that SpecialObject does not add to or change StandardObject in any way. It is essentially the same object. This approach has the advantage of being more flexible (E.G. We could add some additional properties to SpecialObject) but in reality it won't change. It will always be identical.

To me inheritance seems like the better approach. Type flags seem like code smell and going forward inheritance seems more like the correct OOP approach. The thing I'm not sure about here is that, given that StandardObject and SpecialObject are the same, is it bad practice to do this? Or are there any reasons why this should be avoided?

There is a similar question here:

Chess piece hierarchy design: inheritance vs type fields

However most of the discussion seems to focus on the chess problem rather than what is considered good design

EDIT:

Encapsulation seems to be the popular solution. The reason why I've avoided encapsulation is best described in the example below:

  • StandardObject is essentially a DTO
  • There is a list of StandardObject.
  • The list gets processed, StandardObject gets serialized
  • The serialized data is sent somewhere over any number of different protocols
  • One of the protocols requires certain parameters to be set if StandardObject is "special"

Given that the additional logic for "special" cases is only required by one of a number of different mechanisms that process StandardObject, the logic for this does not seem like it belongs anywhere near StandardObject

share|improve this question
    
Why can't you just add a boolean, IsSpecial, to StandardObject? You say that "doesn't seem like the best approach" - why not? –  wohanley Sep 7 '12 at 2:44
1  
@wohanley: I could, but the whole point of the question is to determine the better approach. Type flags seem like code smell to me but for this example maybe it is the best approach. This is what I'm trying to find out about –  wdavo Sep 7 '12 at 2:47
2  
StandardObject and SpecialObject are obviously not the same; one is standard, and the other is special. –  phoog Sep 7 '12 at 2:47
    
Regarding your edit: what is it about a special object that makes it special? Can the protocol determine the specialness of an object by examining the values of its properties or fields? Is the specialness an arbitrary property determined by the object's creator? What does "special" really mean here? –  phoog Sep 7 '12 at 3:31
    
StandardObject contains some raw binary data. This data can come from different sources. One of protocols requires that if the data comes from a particular source, that some certain parameters be set. This can't be determined from any of the current properties. Sorry If it seems vague but I was trying to keep the problem as generic as possible as I was more interested in best practices rather than concrete solutions –  wdavo Sep 7 '12 at 3:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

They are both code smells. If you have special handling that must be accomplished differently between two related types, have them both implement some virtual method or interface operation that allows them to handle the special case (or not, if it's not necessary).

share|improve this answer
    
I've made an edit explaining why I'm avoiding encapsulation. I'm not sure if you had any thoughts on this –  wdavo Sep 7 '12 at 3:09
    
Ok, in that case, the question is: where does the processing occur? If the DTO is just data, and some other controller is operating on the data, the choice is for a type flag, not for special inheritance and type checks. If the processing occurs on the object itself, use inheritance correctly rather than do either of the type checks you listed. –  Randolpho Sep 7 '12 at 4:18
    
There are a number of derived classes that inherit from an 'Output' base class. One of these derived classes requires some additional logic if it is a "special" object –  wdavo Sep 7 '12 at 4:23
1  
but where is the logic executed? Is it contained within the special object (either in the class itself or within a base class), or is it contained within a controller object that operates on the data contained within the special object? If it's the first, go with my original suggestion. If it's the latter, go with a data type field in the object. Checking the type of the object and branching based on that should be avoided unless you are working with some legacy code that you cannot refactor. –  Randolpho Sep 7 '12 at 15:36

You could also encapsulate your "handling" logic using a strategy pattern by having an abstract base class where you could also put shared implementation. Or you could call a derived implementation and the inherited implementation as well.

public abstract class Vehicle
{
    private MovementStrategy movementStrategy;

    protected Vehicle(MovementStrategy strategy)
    {
        this.movementStrategy = strategy;
    }

    public void Move()
    {
        movementStrategy.Move();
    }

    public virtual void CommonAlert()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Base generic vehicle alert");
    }
}

public class Car : Vehicle
{
    public Car(MovementStrategy movementStrategy)
        : base(movementStrategy)
    {
    }

    public override void CommonAlert()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Car says 'Honk!'");
    }
}

public class Elevator : Vehicle
{
    public Elevator(MovementStrategy movementStrategy)
        : base(movementStrategy)
    {
    }

    public override void CommonAlert()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Elevator says 'Ding!'");
        base.CommonAlert();
    }
}

public abstract class MovementStrategy
{
    public abstract void Move();
}

public class CarMovementStrategy : MovementStrategy
{
    public override void Move()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Car moved");
    }
}

public class ElevatorMovementStrategy : MovementStrategy
{
    public override void Move()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Elevator moved");
    }
}

Then, for your main program, a sample use:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Vehicle elevator = new Elevator(new ElevatorMovementStrategy());
        Vehicle car = new Car(new CarMovementStrategy());

        elevator.Move();
        car.Move();

        elevator.CommonAlert();
        car.CommonAlert();

        Console.Read();

    }
}
share|improve this answer

If you are going to need to handle the object differently based on properties of the object you would be better off putting the method to manipulate the object inside of the class. The behavior of the object could be determined by some private state variable, or by the type of derived object, but the calling code needs no knowledge of that.

To sketch this out say we have an element that will need to be drawn a specific way depending on some attribute.

If the class simply has the handling in it you would just have to do:

MyElement.Draw();

Instead of:

if(MyElement.Flag)
{
     DrawBlue(MyElement);
}
else
{
    DrawRed(MyElement);
}

To the calling code there is no need to expose the way that the specific behavior must be determined.

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