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I'm currently trying to load a UITableView list of Flickr Photo (cs193p iOS Stanford, assignment 5). To avoid UI blocking event, I've deferred the thumbnail download of each cell into a different queue (but do update the UI back in the main queue). This code doesn't asynchronously load the images, though does add a thumbnail once I click on of the UITableViewCell row. (see screenshots below). Any idea what i'm doing wrong?

PS: I've looked already in a few other stackoverflow questions & Apple's LazyTableImages example, but I remain convinced this is the cleanest way to achieve the desired result.

Thanks!

- (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath
{
    static NSString *CellIdentifier = @"Photo List Cell";
    UITableViewCell *cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:CellIdentifier];

    // Configure the cell
    NSDictionary *photo = [self.photoList objectAtIndex:indexPath.row];


    if (photo != nil) {
        if ([[photo objectForKey:@"title"] length] > 0) {
            cell.textLabel.text = [photo objectForKey:@"title"];
        } else if ([[[photo objectForKey:@"description"] objectForKey:@"_content"] length] > 0) {
            cell.textLabel.text = [[photo objectForKey:@"description"] objectForKey:@"_content"];
        } else {
            cell.textLabel.text = @"Unknown";
        }
    }
    cell.imageView.image = [[UIImage alloc] initWithCIImage:nil];

    // Fetch using GCD
    dispatch_queue_t downloadThumbnailQueue = dispatch_queue_create("Get Photo Thumbnail", NULL);
    dispatch_async(downloadThumbnailQueue, ^{
        UIImage *image = [self getTopPlacePhotoThumbnail:photo];
        dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^{
            if ([self.tableView.visibleCells containsObject:cell]) {
                [cell.imageView setImage:image];
            }
        });
    });
    dispatch_release(downloadThumbnailQueue);

    return cell;
}

Before clicking a row Before clicking a row

After selecting the row After selecting the row

UPDATE: For those interested, this is the final code I used:

- (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath
{
  static NSString *CellIdentifier = @"Photo List Cell";
  UITableViewCell *cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:CellIdentifier];

  // Configure the cell
  NSDictionary *photo = [self.photoList objectAtIndex:indexPath.row];

  if (photo != nil) {
    if ([[photo objectForKey:@"title"] length] > 0) {
        cell.textLabel.text = [photo objectForKey:@"title"];
    } else if ([[[photo objectForKey:@"description"] objectForKey:@"_content"] length] > 0) {
        cell.textLabel.text = [[photo objectForKey:@"description"] objectForKey:@"_content"];
    } else {
        cell.textLabel.text = @"Unknown";
    }
  }
  cell.imageView.image = [[UIImage alloc] initWithCIImage:nil];

  // Fetch using GCD
  dispatch_queue_t downloadThumbnailQueue = dispatch_queue_create("Get Photo Thumbnail", NULL);
  dispatch_async(downloadThumbnailQueue, ^{
    UIImage *image = [self getTopPlacePhotoThumbnail:photo];
    dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^{
        UITableViewCell *cellToUpdate = [self.tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:indexPath]; // create a copy of the cell to avoid keeping a strong pointer to "cell" since that one may have been reused by the time the block is ready to update it. 
        if (cellToUpdate != nil) {
            [cellToUpdate.imageView setImage:image];
            [cellToUpdate setNeedsLayout];
        }
    });
  });
  dispatch_release(downloadThumbnailQueue);

  return cell;
}
share|improve this question
    
Hey, this is totally off topic, but wondering if inside the block you send to the main thread, instead of checking for object equality on the cell, check if a cell at indexPath exists? –  Carl Veazey Sep 7 '12 at 4:42
    
I just tried this: if ([self.tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:indexPath] != nil) { ...etc } and it works just fine as well. Is that what you had in mind? –  sybohy Sep 7 '12 at 4:47
    
Right, and not using cell.imageView directly in your block but rather grabbing the cell at indexPath and using its image view. I think you might run into issues with cell reuse if you use cell directly the way it is scoped inside your main thread block. –  Carl Veazey Sep 7 '12 at 4:54
    
yes, you are correct! The block will keep a strong pointer to the cell, and this will indeed be an issue if it tries to update the image of a cell that is currently being re-used for a different Flickr Photo. Nice catch! –  sybohy Sep 7 '12 at 5:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You should call setNeedsLayout on the cell after setting the thumbnail.

From the Apple Doc:

"Call this method on your application’s main thread when you want to adjust the layout of a view’s subviews. This method makes a note of the request and returns immediately. Because this method does not force an immediate update, but instead waits for the next update cycle, you can use it to invalidate the layout of multiple views before any of those views are updated. This behavior allows you to consolidate all of your layout updates to one update cycle, which is usually better for performance."

share|improve this answer
    
wow. that was quick! Thanks Carl, i would have never figured it out on my own. Thanks again!! –  sybohy Sep 7 '12 at 4:24
    
You're welcome, glad it worked! –  Carl Veazey Sep 7 '12 at 4:25
    
Actually, quick question: wouldn't it technically be better to call [cell setNeedsLayout]? I was reading the Apple doc for layoutSubviews and this is what I found: "You should not call this method [layoutSubviews] directly. If you want to force a layout update, call the setNeedsLayout method instead to do so prior to the next drawing update." What do you think? (both functionally work by the way) –  sybohy Sep 7 '12 at 4:33
    
Ah, you're totally right, that's what I meant, was just going too fast there! –  Carl Veazey Sep 7 '12 at 4:34
    
Thanks for catching my mistake, and for accepting the answer! –  Carl Veazey Sep 7 '12 at 4:38

Another solution (and the one that I used for that assignment) is to call setNeedsDisplay on on the cell's imageView once you have assigned the UIImage to that imageView.

So basically, I created a class called FlickrDownloader that wraps up the functionality of FlickrFetcher (as well as my caching code). FlickrDownloader has this method:

(void)getImageForPhotoInfo:(NSDictionary *)photoInfo ofFormat:(FlickrPhotoFormat)format withCallback:(image_setter_callback_t)callback;

This is basically a call to the same function of FlickrFetcher, but it adds a callback thats is called upon the completion of downloading the photo. In the case of updating the imageView of a UITableViewCell the callback looks like this:

image_setter_callback_t setImage = ^(UIImage *image){
    cell.imageView.image = image;
    [cell.imageView setNeedsDisplay];
};
share|improve this answer
    
Did that get around the cell setting the frame to (0,0,0,0)? When I tried something similar it didn't resize until I forced layoutSubviews to get called. Were you using a placeholder image maybe? –  Carl Veazey Sep 7 '12 at 4:52
    
if you call [cell.imageView setNeedsDisplay], doesn't that require your class to implement the drawRect method? Checking back over the fall 2011 lecture 4 slide #8, setNeedsDisplay sets up everything in order to call drawRect. It doesn't really say whether it does more or less than that. does it? –  sybohy Sep 7 '12 at 4:56
    
@CarlVeazey You are correct in that I used a placeholder image like the LazyTableImages example. Since this was my approach from the beginning, perhaps that's how I got around setting the frame. –  Scott H Sep 7 '12 at 5:11
    
@sybohy setNeedsDisplay tells the drawing routines that a view needs it's drawRect called. The UIImageView class does have a drawRect method... though perhaps inherited from another class. I believe you may be referring to the steps necessary to implement a custom drawRect for a view and using setNeedsDisplay to cause that drawRect to be called. –  Scott H Sep 7 '12 at 5:17

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