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I tried this query

db.tablebusiness.find({ "LongitudeLatitude" : { "$nearSphere" : [106.772835, -6.186753], "$maxDistance" : 0.053980478460939611 }, "Prominent" : { "$gte" : 15 }, "indexContents" : { "$all" : [/^warung/, /^nasi/] } }).skip(20).limit(20);

This is what the log from Amazon EC2 instance micro says

Fri Sep 07 03:21:08 [clientcursormon] mem (MB) res:312 virt:12424 mapped:6094
Fri Sep 07 03:21:43 [conn52] query isikotacobacoba.tablebusiness query: { $query: { LongitudeLatitude: { $nearSphere: [ 106.772835, -6.186753 ], $maxDistance: 0.05398047846093961 }, Prominent: { $gte: 15 }, indexContents: { $all: [ /^warung/, /^nasi/ ] } }, $hint: { LongitudeLatitude: "2d", Prominent: -1, indexContents: 1 } } ntoreturn:20 ntoskip:20 nscanned:40 nreturned:20 reslen:1141 567133ms
Fri Sep 07 03:22:04 [DataFileSync] flushing mmap took 15ms  for 9 files

If I use my own local computer with 8GB memory the result is fast, namely 2 seconds. However, if I do not limit the query the result is still slow. For example:

db.tablebusiness.find({ "LongitudeLatitude" : { "$nearSphere" : [106.772835, -6.186753], "$maxDistance" : 0.053980478460939611 }, "Prominent" : { "$gte" : 15 }, "indexContents" : { "$all" : [/^warung/, /^nasi/] } }).limit(200);

Takes a VERY long time. Now, finding closest 200 points are not supposed to be tough right?

So memory couldn't possibly be the issue. How come trying to find 200 points take a long time if there are only 3600 points within 5 km.

Here is the log on a large 8GB i5 machine

Fri Sep 07 12:29:23 [conn5] command admin.$cmd command: { buildinfo: 1 } ntoreturn:1 reslen:340 0ms
Fri Sep 07 12:29:25 [conn4] query isikotacobacoba.tablebusiness query: { LongitudeLatitude: { $nearSphere: [ 106.772835, -6.186753 ], $maxDistance: 0.05398047846093961 }, Prominent: { $gte: 15 }, indexContents: { $all: [ /^warung/, /^nasi/ ] } } ntoreturn:100000 ntoskip:20 nscanned:262 nreturned:242 reslen:300329 501562ms
Fri Sep 07 12:29:34 [conn4] run command admin.$cmd { ping: 1 }

This is samples of typical data

{
  "_id" : "warung-nasi-nur-karomah__-6.19_106.78",
  "BuildingID" : null,
  "Title" : "Warung Nasi Nur Karomah",
  "InBuildingAddress" : null,
  "Building" : null,
  "Street" : "Jl. Arjuna Utara No.35",
  "Districts" : [],
  "City" : "Jakarta",
  "Country" : "Indonesia",
   "Checkin" : 0,
  "Note" : null,
  "PeopleCount" : 0,
  "Prominent" : 45.5,
  "CountViews" : 0,
  "StreetAdditional" : null,
  "LongitudeLatitude" : {
    "Longitude" : 106.775693893433,
    "Latitude" : -6.18759540055471
  },
  "Rating" : {
    "Stars" : 0.0,
    "Weight" : 0.0
  },
  "CurrentlyWorkedURL" : null,
  "Reviews" : [],
  "ZIP" : null,
  "Tags" : ["Restaurant"],
  "Phones" : ["081380087011"],
  "Website" : null,
  "Email" : null,
  "Price" : null,
  "openingHour" : null,
  "Promotions" : [],
  "SomethingWrong" : false,
  "BizMenus" : [],
  "Brochures" : [],
  "Aliases" : [],
  "indexContents" : ["restaura", "estauran", "staurant", "taurant", "aurant", "urant", "rant", "ant", "nt", "t", "warung", "arung", "rung", "ung", "ng", "g", "nasi", "asi", "si", "i", "nur", "ur", "r", "karomah", "aromah", "romah", "omah", "mah", "ah", "h"]
}

This is the log of the same query on my home machine (not amazon ec2 instance micro)

Fri Sep 07 10:52:28 [conn1] query isikotacobacoba.tablebusiness query: { LongitudeLatitude: { $nearSphere: [ 106.772835, -6.186753 ], $maxDistance: 0.05398047846093961 }, Prominent: { $gte: 15 }, indexContents: { $all: [ /^warung/, /^nasi/ ] } } ntoreturn:50 nscanned:50 nreturned:50 reslen:62090 2048ms

I understand that amazonec2 is slower than my home computer

The index is

  db.tablebusiness.getIndexes();
    [
            {
                    "v" : 1,
                    "key" : {
                            "_id" : 1
                    },
                    "ns" : "isikotacobacoba.tablebusiness",
                    "name" : "_id_"
            },
            {
                    "v" : 1,
                    "key" : {
                            "LongitudeLatitude" : "2d",
                            "Prominent" : -1,
                            "indexContents" : 1
                    },
                    "ns" : "isikotacobacoba.tablebusiness",
                    "name" : "LongLat_Prominent_indexContents",
                    "dropDups" : false,
                    "background" : false
            },
            {
                    "v" : 1,
                    "key" : {
                            "LongitudeLatitude" : "2d",
                            "Prominent" : -1
                    },
                    "ns" : "isikotacobacoba.tablebusiness",
                    "name" : "LongLat_Prominent",
                    "dropDups" : false,
                    "background" : false
            }
    ]

As you see it is properly indexes

One possible issue is lack of memory in amazon micro instance.

However, the nearSphere is limited by 0.053980478460939611 degree (around 5 km). Even without indexes, even with just table scan, it shouldn't need that much memory.

What's the real problem?

Here is the buildinfo of the mongodb

>  db.runCommand("buildInfo")
{
        "version" : "2.0.7",
        "gitVersion" : "875033920e8869d284f32119413543fa475227bf",
        "sysInfo" : "windows sys.getwindowsversion(major=6, minor=1, build=7601,
 platform=2, service_pack='Service Pack 1') BOOST_LIB_VERSION=1_42",
        "versionArray" : [
                2,
                0,
                7,
                0
        ],
        "bits" : 64,
        "debug" : false,
        "maxBsonObjectSize" : 16777216,
        "ok" : 1
}
>

I did some further testing:

db.tablebusiness.find({ "LongitudeLatitude" : { "$nearSphere" : [106.772835, -6.186753], "$maxDistance" : 0.053980478460939611 } }).skip(20).limit(100000); Returns "only" 3600 documents. Actually it does take 500 seconds.

Even if mongodb doesn't use index, scanning 3600 documents, computing the distance and then sort them shouldn't take long even for a micro machine.

Now, if I don't use $nearsphere but $near instead things are better but still dissapointing

Fri Sep 07 04:49:38 [conn61] query isikotacobacoba.tablebusiness query: { LongitudeLatitude: { $near: [ 106.772835, -6.186753 ], $maxDistance: 0.05398047846093961 }, Prominent: { $gte: 15.0 }, indexContents: { $all: [ /^warung/, /^nasi/ ] } } ntoreturn:20 ntoskip:20 nscanned:32 nreturned:12 reslen:14984 49636ms
Fri Sep 07 04:49:38 [conn61] run command admin.$cmd { replSetGetStatus: 1, forShell: 1 }

explain() from Amazon EC2 instance Micro

{
        "cursor" : "GeoSearchCursor",
        "nscanned" : 40,
        "nscannedObjects" : 40,
        "n" : 20,
        "millis" : 349182,
        "nYields" : 0,
        "nChunkSkips" : 0,
        "isMultiKey" : false,
        "indexOnly" : false,
        "indexBounds" : {

        }
}

Explain() from My localhost home computer with the same query

{
        "cursor" : "GeoSearchCursor",
        "nscanned" : 40,
        "nscannedObjects" : 40,
        "n" : 20,
        "millis" : 4849,
        "nYields" : 0,
        "nChunkSkips" : 0,
        "isMultiKey" : false,
        "indexOnly" : false,
        "indexBounds" : {

        }
}

This happens randomly. Most of the time it's blazing fast. When it's slow, it's slow like hell.

share|improve this question
    
Jim Thio, what amount of RAM is available on your instance? What are the size of the documents? –  daveh Sep 7 '12 at 4:51
    
The ram is 712 MB not fully used. Size of each document is around 1kb I think. How do we know? –  Jim Thio Sep 7 '12 at 4:56
    
I copy to msword and say that typical document have like 1k-2k character. So even if they load the WHOLE document we're talking about at most 70 MB memory –  Jim Thio Sep 7 '12 at 5:01
    
Can you add a .explain() to the end of your query and post the output? May be better in a pastebin –  daveh Sep 7 '12 at 5:02
    
Already add the .explain. However, it doesn't show which indexes are used. Also only 20 businesses are scanned it seems. –  Jim Thio Sep 7 '12 at 7:52

2 Answers 2

The EC2 Micro instances only have 640MB of RAM, and no local storage. If you have a large working set that doesn't fit into memory, you would experience many page faults, which will be even costlier because data needs to be paged in over the network.

In order to test this, you can run mongostat while doing the query and check if there are many page faults. If that is the case, upgrading to a larger EC2 instance with more RAM and local storage will likely resolve the issue.

share|improve this answer
    
That would be a natural thing to guess. However, even on 8GB machine, increasing the search limit to 200 will cause the query to run a very long time despite indexing. –  Jim Thio Sep 7 '12 at 5:29
    
db.tablebusiness.find({ "LongitudeLatitude" : { "$nearSphere" : [106.772835, -6.186753], "$maxDistance" : 0.053980478460939611 }, "Prominent" : { "$gte" : 15 }, "indexContents" : { "$all" : [/^warung/, /^nasi/] } }).limit(200); Takes a VERY long time. Now, finding closest 200 points are not supposed to be tough right? –  Jim Thio Sep 7 '12 at 5:30
    
The .limit() only limits the number of results returned, it still needs to find the nearest points. As daveh suggested above, can you run the query with an .explain() attached and paste the output? This will tell us if the index is being used correctly and how many documents have to be scanned. –  Thomas Sep 7 '12 at 6:02
    
Okay I'll work on it. I thought they start with small circle and stop when limit reached. If they used Rtree it should be faster. –  Jim Thio Sep 7 '12 at 6:42
    
The same query also takes a long time on machine with 8GB if the limit is increased to 200 –  Jim Thio Sep 7 '12 at 10:53
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I asked similar question here Why $in is much faster than $all?

Turns out there was a bug in mongodb affecting $all. That's the main issue. Changing the hardware improve, but not as much as not bother using $all at all.

share|improve this answer

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