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Is there any faster method of matrix exponentiation to calculate M^n ( where M is a matrix and n is an integer ) than the simple divide and conquer algorithm.

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Hey i found one link in stackoverflow only check it out stackoverflow.com/questions/12268516/… –  user1206604 Sep 7 '12 at 4:57
    
Expokit is a well known package for performing matrix exponentiations. fortranwiki.org/fortran/show/Expokit –  Sayan Sep 7 '12 at 5:00

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You could factor the matrix into eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Then you get

M = V^-1 * D * V

Where V is the eigenvector matrix and D is a diagonal matrix. To raise this to the Nth power, you get something like:

M^n = (V^-1 * D * V) * (V^-1 * D * V) * ... * (V^-1 * D * V)
    = V^-1 * D^n * V

Because all the V and V^-1 terms cancel.

Since D is diagonal, you just have to raise a bunch of (real) numbers to the nth power, rather than full matrices. You can do that in logarithmic time in n.

Calculating eigenvalues and eigenvectors is r^3 (where r is the number of rows/columns of M). Depending on the relative sizes of r and n, this might be faster or not.

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As far as i know this method has the same complexity as Exponentiation by Squaring. So is there any faster method ? –  Akashdeep Saluja Sep 7 '12 at 5:12
    
@AkashdeepSaluja: this is faster then exponentiation by squaring. This is O(r^3) time, exponentiation by squaring is O(r^3 logn) time. –  Keith Randall Sep 7 '12 at 6:43
    
for a better explanation of the method mentioned above google.co.in/… –  Akashdeep Saluja Sep 7 '12 at 14:08
    
Very nice solution of the problem. Thanks a lot! I will use it in future! –  Gloomcore Sep 11 '12 at 8:39
    
Isn't it necessary for the matrix to be symmetric/hermitian in order to be decomposed into eigenvectors?en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spectral_theorem –  pqnet Jun 16 at 9:05

It's quite simple to use Euler fast power algorith. Use next algorith.

#define SIZE 10

//It's simple E matrix
// 1 0 ... 0
// 0 1 ... 0
// ....
// 0 0 ... 1
void one(long a[SIZE][SIZE])
{
    for (int i = 0; i < SIZE; i++)
        for (int j = 0; j < SIZE; j++)
            a[i][j] = (i == j);
}

//Multiply matrix a to matrix b and print result into a
void mul(long a[SIZE][SIZE], long b[SIZE][SIZE])
{
    long res[SIZE][SIZE] = {{0}};

    for (int i = 0; i < SIZE; i++)
        for (int j = 0; j < SIZE; j++)
            for (int k = 0; k < SIZE; k++)
            {
                res[i][j] += a[i][k] * b[k][j];
            }

    for (int i = 0; i < SIZE; i++)
        for (int j = 0; j < SIZE; j++)
            a[i][j] = res[i][j];
}

//Caluclate a^n and print result into matrix res
void pow(long a[SIZE][SIZE], long n, long res[SIZE][SIZE])
{
    one(res);

    while (n > 0) {
        if (n % 2 == 0)
        {
            mul(a, a);
            n /= 2;
        }
        else {
            mul(res, a);
            n--;
        }
    }
}

Below please find equivalent for numbers:

long power(long num, long pow)
{
    if (pow == 0) return 1;
    if (pow % 2 == 0)
        return power(num*num, pow / 2);
    else
        return power(num, pow - 1) * num;
}
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Exponentiation by squaring is frequently used to get high powers of matrices.

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i know this method but need to speed it up further. –  Akashdeep Saluja Sep 7 '12 at 5:00
    
You'd better add this algorithm name into the question to avoid similar answers :) –  MBo Sep 7 '12 at 5:19
    
Faster algorithm are much more complicated. –  Ari Sep 7 '12 at 12:08

I would recommend approach used to calculate Fibbonacci sequence in matrix form. AFAIK, its efficiency is O(log(n)).

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You have to multiply that by the cost of multiplying matrices. The overall running time is O (n^3 log n). –  saadtaame Jun 13 at 13:23

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