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I am running my junit tests via ant and they are running substantially slower than via the IDE. My ant call is:

    <junit fork="yes" forkmode="once" printsummary="off">
        <classpath refid="test.classpath"/>
        <formatter type="brief" usefile="false"/>
        <batchtest todir="${test.results.dir}/xml">
            <formatter type="xml"/>
            <fileset dir="src" includes="**/*Test.java" />
        </batchtest>
    </junit>

The same test that runs in near instantaneously in my IDE (0.067s) takes 4.632s when run through Ant. In the past, I've been able to speed up test problems like this by using the junit fork parameter but this doesn't seem to be helping in this case. What properties or parameters can I look at to speed up these tests?

More info:

I am using the reported time from the IDE vs. the time that the junit task outputs. This is not the sum total time reported at the end of the ant run.

So, bizarrely, this problem has resolved itself. What could have caused this problem? The system runs on a local disk so that is not the problem.

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1  
Wouldn't fork=yes hurt performance by spawning a new process to run a single test? What is the result when you don't use it? – Outlaw Programmer Sep 23 '08 at 19:13
1  
with forkmode="once" I thought that it would run all of the junit tests in a single separate thread. There is no material peformance change between fork="no and fork="yes". – Alex B Sep 23 '08 at 19:20
    
Are you using Ant's reported run time or JUnit's? Ant is doing a lot more work (determining what tests to run, probably compiling) than just running the test via the IDE. – John Meagher Sep 23 '08 at 21:18

Here's a blind guess: try increasing the maximum heap size available to the forked VM by using a nested <jvmarg> tag to set the -Xmx option.

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I was going to suggest this, along with increasing the heap size available to Ant itself, as well. – matt b Oct 24 '08 at 19:21

I'm guessing it's because your antscript is outputing results to XML files, whereas the IDE is keeping those in memory. It takes longer to write a file than to not write a file.

todir="${test.results.dir}/xml"

That's the part of the <batchtest> call that tells it to stick the results into that directory. It looks like leaving it off just tells it to stick the results in the "current directory", whatever that is. At first glance I didn't see anything to turn it all the way off.

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Difficult to tell with that information. First thing I would do is look at the test results and determine if all the individual tests are running uniformly slower or if it can be narrowed down to a certain subset of test cases.

(The zero'th thing I would do is make sure that my ant task is using the same JVM as Eclipse and that the classpath dependencies and imported JARs are really and truly identical)

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1  
The jars and JVM are the same. It seems that across the board any test that runs in < 1.0 second in an IDE runs in 3.5-4.5 seconds via ant. – Alex B Sep 23 '08 at 19:21

Maybe you are seeing that because Eclipse do incremental compiling and Ant don't. Can you confirm that this time is wasted only in the test target?

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I am also seeing the junit task take a long time. It's definitely not the compilation phase. The actual time reported by JUnit is low (eg: Tests run: 21, Failures: 0, Errors: 0, Time elapsed: 0.034 sec), so I expect it's time spent between test suites that's adding up. Running all tests in IntelliJ takes about two seconds, however running them via Ant's junit task takes closer to 20 seconds. – Drew Noakes Dec 30 '12 at 19:14

For the record, I found my problem. We have been using a code obfuscator for this project, and the string encryption portion of that obfuscator was set to "maximum". This slowed down any operation where strings were present.

Turning down the string encryption to a faster mode fixed the problem.

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Try setting fork, formode and threads to these values:

<junit fork="yes" forkmode="perTest" printsummary="off" threads="4">
    <classpath refid="test.classpath"/>
    <formatter type="brief" usefile="false"/>
    <batchtest todir="${test.results.dir}/xml">
        <formatter type="xml"/>
        <fileset dir="src" includes="**/*Test.java" />
    </batchtest>
</junit>

Also see https://ant.apache.org/manual/Tasks/junit.html

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