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I am receiving this error:

  File "/DateDbLoop.py", line 33  
    d.Id""" % (str(day), str(2840))"  
    ^  
SyntaxError: EOL while scanning single-quoted string

Here is the script. There are 4 double quotes to open this, but I am unsure how to correctly close this out?

Follow Up Question:

Does this % (str(day), str(2840)) need to go in both the sql variable and the os.system() call?

#!/usr/bin/python

import datetime
import sys, os, time, string

a = datetime.date(2009, 1, 1)
b = datetime.date(2009, 2, 1)
one_day = datetime.timedelta(1)

day = a

while day <= b:

    print "Running query for \"" + str(day) + "\""

    sql=""""SELECT
        d.Date,  
        SUM(d.Revenue),  
        FROM Table d  
        WHERE d.Date = '%s'  
        AND d.Id = %s  
        GROUP BY d.Date  
        """ % (str(day), str(2840))"

    os.system('mysql -h -sN -u  -p -e %s > FileName-%s.txt db' % (sql, str(day)))
    day += one_day
share|improve this question
    
@David: I tried to fix the formatting a bit. If you disagree with what I've done feel free to rollback. –  bernie Aug 5 '09 at 5:32
    
Nope, thats fine, thanks Adam. Still getting the hang of how the site works. –  David Perron Aug 5 '09 at 6:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You have 4 double-quotes at your sql= line, make it 3 instead. Also remove the single quote after your %-substitution value.

#!/usr/bin/python

import datetime
import sys, os, time, string

a = datetime.date(2009, 1, 1)
b = datetime.date(2009, 2, 1)
one_day = datetime.timedelta(1)

day = a

while day <= b:
    print "Running query for \"" + str(day) + "\""

    sql="""SELECT
    d.Date,  
    SUM(d.Revenue)
    FROM Table d  
    WHERE d.Date = '%s'  
    AND d.Id = %s  
    GROUP BY d.Date  
    """ % (str(day), str(2840))

    os.system('mysql -h -sN -u  -p -e "%s" > FileName-%s.txt db' % (sql, str(day)))
    day += one_day

Multi-line string values are done with paired triplets of double-quotes in Python, and don't nest inside regular double-quotes.

share|improve this answer
    
Triple single quotes would also work. Python doesn't distinguish between single or double, except you open and close strings with the same character(s). –  Heikki Toivonen Aug 5 '09 at 5:54
    
Yep. Very handy when the thing you're wanting to quote has one type or another of quote mark already in it. –  Amber Aug 5 '09 at 5:56
    
Thanks Dav. I made this change but now I am getting an new error. This time it is a mysql error: ERROR 1064 (42000) at line 1: You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near '' at line 1 I just realized: Do I need to have this % (str(day), str(2840)) in both the sql variable and the os.system() ? –  David Perron Aug 5 '09 at 6:17
    
Ah, no, the issue is that since you're echoing it to the command line, it needs to be quoted on the command line. I'd use double quotes within your os.system call to do that - I'll edit the example code above to reflect it, note the "%s" instead of just %s now. –  Amber Aug 5 '09 at 6:29
    
Also you needed to remove the comma after the SUM() in the select, since it's the last item before the FROM. I edited the example for that too. –  Amber Aug 5 '09 at 6:31

You use triple quotes for this.

s = """
Python is awesome.
Python is cool.
I use Python.
And so should you.
"""

print s

Python is awesome.
Python is cool.
I use Python.
And so should you.
share|improve this answer
    
@Steve: in case you did not know, you can highlight your code and press Ctrl-k to get it to be formatted in a monospace font with syntax highlighting. –  bernie Aug 5 '09 at 5:35
    
Awesome! I thought you had to hit Ctrl+k for each line. This is much easier :) –  DevDevDev Aug 5 '09 at 5:38

Open and close the string with three quotes

sql = """
      SELECT d.Date, SUM(d.Revenue),
      FROM Table d WHERE d.Date = '%s' AND d.Id = %s 
      GROUP BY d.Date
      """ % (str(day), str(2840))

You can also break a line in the middle of a string with the \ character.

#!/usr/bin/python

import datetime
import sys, os, time, string

a = datetime.date(2009, 1, 1)
b = datetime.date(2009, 2, 1)
one_day = datetime.timedelta(1)

day = a

while day <= b:

 print "Running query for \"" + str(day) + "\""

 sql="SELECT d.Date, SUM(d.Revenue), FROM Table d WHERE d.Date = '%s' \
      AND d.Id = %s GROUP BY d.Date " % (str(day), str(2840))

 os.system('mysql -h -sN -u  -p -e %s > FileName-%s.txt db' % (sql, str(day)))
share|improve this answer

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