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Lately I have been receiving informations from users about my alarm app not ringing when it should. Finally, one of the users have send me information from build in log, that was really strange:

74. 4:25:0 - StartAlarm received
75. 5:22:15 - AlarmOnScreen create
76. 5:22:15 - Time: 04:25

Problem is, informations to log are saved as follow:

//BroadcastReceiver
@Override
public void onReceive(Context context, Intent intent) {
    Logger.initialize(context);
    Logger.log("StartAlarm received");
    Intent i = new Intent(context, AlarmOnScreen.class);
    i.putExtras(intent.getExtras());
    i.addFlags(Intent.FLAG_ACTIVITY_NEW_TASK);
    context.startActivity(i);
}

//AlarmOnScreen (activity)
@Override
protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
    setContentView(R.layout.alarm_on_screen);
    Logger.log("AlarmOnScreen create");
    //Time value of alarm is logged below
    (...)

As you can see, start of the activity was delayed considerably. How is that possible? User raported that alarm was delayed until he started "using" the phone - I guess that means, until lockscreen was unlocked or screen turned on. I am still waiting for answer with more informations. On other time delay was only 5 minutes - every time, until user started "using phone"

Any ideas?

EDIT: Let me add, that is something that have started happening lately, after application being out for months. I am still looking if I have maybe changed anything in manifest and in last update, but is it possible that it is somthing that happens only on new Android versions?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted
+50

I think your problem is about using AlarmManager without proper use of WakeLocks, when device "sleeps" with screen turned-off, your receiver will not work properly.

I guess your receiver got onReceive() from AlarmManager, which is most probably was started with _WAKEUP flag like this:

mAlarmManager.set(AlarmManager.RTC_WAKEUP, .......);

This _WAKEUP flag means that device will "turn-on" even if it will be in a sleep mode. However, as described by documentation here ( http://developer.android.com/reference/android/app/AlarmManager.html ) :

The Alarm Manager holds a CPU wake lock as long as the alarm receiver's onReceive() method is executing. This guarantees that the phone will not sleep until you have finished handling the broadcast. Once onReceive() returns, the Alarm Manager releases this wake lock. This means that the phone will in some cases sleep as soon as your onReceive() method completes. If your alarm receiver called Context.startService(), it is possible that the phone will sleep before the requested service is launched. To prevent this, your BroadcastReceiver and Service will need to implement a separate wake lock policy to ensure that the phone continues running until the service becomes available.

In your code that means that system goes back to sleep as soon as onReceive() ends, and as startActivity(i) doesn't work synchronously - that leads directly to the problem, mentioned above - it will be launched, but much, much later, just when user will turn the screen on.

To solve it, I would recommend doing something like this:

//BroadcastReceiver
@Override
public void onReceive(Context context, Intent intent) {
    Logger.initialize(context);
    Logger.log("StartAlarm received");
    Intent i = new Intent(context, AlarmOnScreen.class);
    i.putExtras(intent.getExtras());
    i.addFlags(Intent.FLAG_ACTIVITY_NEW_TASK);
    context.startActivity(i);
    AlarmOnScreen.acquireLock(context);
    //Before, system could sleep right after this line(not exactly, however) and activity actually would be started much later
}

//AlarmOnScreen (activity)

private static WakeLock sWakeLock;
public static void acquireLock(Context context) {
    PowerManager pm = (PowerManager)  context.getSystemService(Context.POWER_SERVICE);
    sWakeLock = pm.newWakeLock(PowerManager.PARTIAL_WAKE_LOCK, "providersLock");
    //Limit 10 sec, if something wrong will happen - we'll not drain the battery to much.
    sWakeLock.acquire(10000); 
    //As we are acquiring and releasing only once - we don't need a counter.
    sWakeLock.setReferenceCounted(false);
}

private static void releaseLock(Context context) {
    try {
        sWakeLock.release();
    } catch (Exception e) {
        //In case it's already auto-released
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}

@Override
protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
    setContentView(R.layout.alarm_on_screen);
    Logger.log("AlarmOnScreen create");
    //Time value of alarm is logged below
    (...)

@Override
protected void onResume() {
    releaseLock(this);
}

This solution will work for the first time and will let you understand the problem deeper. To test - just start to use your alarms when screen is off and, possibly, cable is plugged-off, but I'm not sure if the last is really needed to get device into sleep mode.

However, I would highly recommend to implement more elegant solution, suitable for your project, because current static-reference design is pretty poor, as it doesn't work perfectly in racing conditions, for example.

Hope it helps and please let me know if any questions. Good luck.

UPD: I think I will also suggest to use not only PARTIAL_WAKE_LOCK, but FULL one. Like:

pm.newWakeLock(PowerManager.FULL_WAKE_LOCK 
    | PowerManager.ACQUIRE_CAUSES_WAKEUP, "providersLock");

That will force the screen to be ON anyway, not depending on previous state and platform reaction on new activity creation.

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Hi, I will try that immediately, hopefully that will help. However, as I said that is not actually happening to me, so I will have to send application with this solution to users that have reported that problem to see if it helps. –  Koger Sep 12 '12 at 9:18
    
Ok. Also consider even replacing PARTIAL_WAKE_LOCK to FULL_WAKE_LOCK - developer.android.com/reference/android/os/… - it will ensure that screen is on. I'd updated the answer. –  AlexN Sep 12 '12 at 15:10
    
Yes, yes, yes, that fixed the problem. So it looks like in 99% cases receiver's wake lock was hold long enough for alarm to fully load and start service with music playing, while on few devices it was released earlier. I would have never find it out on my own, thank you very much for helping. I am using PARTIAL_WAKE_LOCK, as screen being on or not depends on users settings and is managed by windows flags –  Koger Sep 13 '12 at 8:47
    
You might want to update/fix your answer however - acquiring lock for 10s and releasing it manually earlier resulted in "WakeLock under-locked" error. After all I just removed release method, but I will work on more elegant solution. BTW, did you have any specific situations in mind mentioning about possible racing conditions? –  Koger Sep 13 '12 at 8:51
    
For example several quick onReceive() calls will create several WakeLocks and only last will be hold by static reference. And from this 2 problems comes: 1) If you were planning to release it manually - you'll not be able to do it. 2) As no references to the WakeLock - GC can run on it and it can throw "finalizing still holding wake-locks" or smth. However on latest Android sources I see it's only a warning and it will release the lock itself. However it's a bad way to "forget" refs to WakeLocks. –  AlexN Sep 13 '12 at 8:59

You have to set several flags to the activity window:

getWindow().addFlags(
    WindowManager.LayoutParams.FLAG_SHOW_WHEN_LOCKED |
    WindowManager.LayoutParams.FLAG_DISMISS_KEYGUARD |
    WindowManager.LayoutParams.FLAG_KEEP_SCREEN_ON |
    WindowManager.LayoutParams.FLAG_TURN_SCREEN_ON
);
share|improve this answer
    
At what moment? I was adding FLAG_DISMISS_KEYGUARD and SHOW_WHEN_LOCKED later in onCreate and that worked fine, is it something that changed in latest Android versions maybe? –  Koger Sep 7 '12 at 8:37

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