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When an async method that is awaited upon throws an exception, the exception is stored somewhere and throwing it is delayed. In a WinForms or WPF application, it uses SynchronizationContext.Current to post throwing of the exception. However, in e.g. a console application, it throws the exception on a thread pool and it brings down the application.

How can I prevent exceptions thrown from an async method from bringing down the application?

EDIT:

Appearantly the issue I'm describing is because I have void async methods. See comments.

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If an async method is awaited, the exception is thrown in the code that awaits it. Unhandled exceptions behave this way only if the method is void returning. This is a reason to avoid using async void methods as much as possible. –  svick Sep 7 '12 at 10:41
1  
@svick async void methods result in deterministic behaviour; calling a Task-returning function which results in an exception and not awaiting the task will raise the UnobservedTaskException event at some semirandom point in the future when the garbage collector runs, and if that does nothing, lets the program silently continue as if everything's all right. The problem isn't with async void methods, they merely expose the real problem. If you don't call a Task-returning function from an async method, there's a good chance you're doing something wrong. –  hvd Sep 7 '12 at 11:53
    
By the way, only "good chance" because there are a few exceptional (no pun intended) cases where it's okay to discard exceptions, but not a whole lot. –  hvd Sep 7 '12 at 11:55
    
@hvd: Event handlers must be void. Why isn't the UnobservedTaskException an issue there? –  Pieter van Ginkel Sep 7 '12 at 12:18
    
@hvd: I think async Task embraces the naturally nondeterministic nature of asynchronous programming. With async void you still get an exception at some semirandom point in the future, one that is (usually) passed directly to your main loop. I think the code is cleaner if you use async Task and ensure they are awaited. IMO. :) –  Stephen Cleary Sep 7 '12 at 12:42

2 Answers 2

How can I prevent exceptions thrown from an async method from bringing down the application?

Follow these best practices:

  1. All async methods should return Task or Task<T> unless they have to return void (e.g., event handlers).
  2. At some point, you should await all Tasks returned from async methods. The only reason you wouldn't want to do this is if you no longer care about the result of the operation (e.g., after you cancel it).
  3. If you need to catch an exception from an async void event handler, then catch it in the event handler - exactly like you would do if this was synchronous code.

You may find my async / await intro post helpful; I cover several other best practices there as well.

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I understand that the problem I'm getting is that I have void async methods. However, does this means that the issue that I'm describing does occur for event handlers? –  Pieter van Ginkel Sep 7 '12 at 12:24
    
Yes; to reiterate the third point, if you have an async void event handler, you probably want to catch exceptions within that event handler. A synchronous event handler will have the exact same problem - it will crash the app if an exception escapes while it's running on a thread pool thread. –  Stephen Cleary Sep 7 '12 at 12:29
    
Except that the exceptions are routed to the SynchronizationContext that was captured when the async method was invoked. In a WinForms/WPF application most of the time this will be a correct synchronization context since the event will most likely have been started from the UI thread. It looks like the behavior isn't that different from what happens when the event isn't async. –  Pieter van Ginkel Sep 7 '12 at 12:32
    
The SynchronizationContext routing is done to emulate the synchronous event handler behavior. Exceptions from both synchronous event handlers and async void event handlers end up in the context. This is true whether the context is UI, ASP.NET, or thread pool. –  Stephen Cleary Sep 7 '12 at 12:36
    
Thanks! Thread Synchronization might solve the problem but this is the right\intended way. –  rushui Sep 21 '13 at 4:59
up vote 8 down vote accepted

When the async method is started, it captures the current synchronization context. A way to solve this issue is to create your own synchronization context which captures the exception.

The point here is that the synchronization context posts the callback to the thread pool, but with a try/catch around it:

public class AsyncSynchronizationContext : SynchronizationContext
{
    public override void Send(SendOrPostCallback d, object state)
    {
        try
        {
            d(state);
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            // Put your exception handling logic here.

            Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
        }
    }

    public override void Post(SendOrPostCallback d, object state)
    {
        try
        {
            d(state);
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            // Put your exception handling logic here.

            Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
        }
    }
}

In the catch above you can put your exception handling logic.

Next, on every thread (SynchronizationContext.Current is [ThreadStatic]) where you want to execute async methods with this mechanism, you must set the current synchronization context:

SynchronizationContext.SetSynchronizationContext(new AsyncSynchronizationContext());

The complete Main example:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        SynchronizationContext.SetSynchronizationContext(new AsyncSynchronizationContext());

        ExecuteAsyncMethod();

        Console.ReadKey();
    }

    private static async void ExecuteAsyncMethod()
    {
        await AsyncMethod();
    }

    private static async Task AsyncMethod()
    {
        throw new Exception("Exception from async");
    }
}
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I'm sorry but I don't see where exactly does your SynchronizationContext post anything on the thread pool - as far as I can see all it does is it executes the function immediately on the calling thread and returns. –  Rafael Munitić May 23 '13 at 22:07

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