Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The project is an Asp.Net Web API web service.

I have a type hierarchy that I need to be able to serialize to and from Json, so I have taken the code from this SO: How to implement custom JsonConverter in JSON.NET to deserialize a List of base class objects, and applied the converter to my hierarchy's base class; something like this (there's pseudo-code here to hide irrelevancies):

[JsonConverter(typeof(TheConverter))]
public class BaseType{
  ///note the base of this type here is from the linked SO above
  private class TheConverter : JsonCreationConverter<BaseType>{
    protected override BaseType Create(Type objectType, JObject jObject){
      Type actualType = GetTypeFromjObject(jObject); /*method elided*/
      return (BaseType)Activator.CreateInstance(actualType);
    }
  }
}

public class RootType {
  public BaseType BaseTypeMember { get; set; }
}

public class DerivedType : BaseType {      
}

So if I deserialize a RootType instance whose BaseTypeMember was equal to an instance of DerivedType, then it will be deserialized back into an instance of that type.

For the record, these JSON objects contain a '$type' field which contains virtual type names (not full .Net type names) so I can simultaneously support types in the JSON whilst controlling exactly which types can be serialized and deserialized.

Now this works really well for deserializing values from the request; but I have an issue with serialization. If you look at the linked SO, and indeed the Json.Net discussion that is linked from the top answer, you'll see that the base code I'm using is entirely geared around deserialization; with examples of its use showing manual creation of the serializer. The JsonConverter implementation brought to the table by this JsonCreationConverter<T> simply throws a NotImplementedException.

Now, because of the way that Web API uses a single formatter for a request, I need to implement 'standard' serialization in the WriteObject method.

I must stress at this point that before embarking on this part of my project I had everything serializing properly without errors.

So I did this:

public override void WriteJson(JsonWriter writer, 
  object value, 
  JsonSerializer serializer)
{
  serializer.Serialize(writer, value);
}

But I get a JsonSerializationException: Self referencing loop detected with type 'DerivedType', when one of the objects is serialized. Again - if I remove the converter attribute (disabling my custom creation) then it works fine...

I have a feeling that this means that my serialization code is actually triggering the converter again on the same object, which in turn calls the serializer again - ad nauseam. Confirmed - see my answer

So what code should I be writing in WriteObject that'll do the same 'standard' serialization that works?

share|improve this question
1  
Nice Q&A, but it's worth pointing out that the serializer is doing the right thing: it inspects the object looking for custom serializers and finds one. You should be worried if it did anything else otherwise it might not respect custom converters on foreign classes. –  Rupert Rawnsley Jul 15 '13 at 11:19
    
@RupertRawnsley yep I agree with that –  Andras Zoltan Jul 15 '13 at 11:23

4 Answers 4

up vote 21 down vote accepted

Well this was fun...

When I looked more closely at the stack trace for the exception, I noticed that the method JsonSerializerInternalWriter.SerializeConvertable was in there twice, indeed it was that method one off the top of the stack - invoking JsonSerializerInternalWriter.CheckForCircularReference - which in turn was throwing the exception. It was also, however, the source of the call to my own converter's Write method.

So it would seem that the serializer was doing:

  • 1) If object has a converter
    • 1a) Throw if circular reference
    • 1b) Invoke converter's Write method
  • 2) Else
    • 2a) Use internal serializers

So, in this case, the Json.Net is calling my converter which in turn is calling the Json.Net serializer which then blows up because it sees it's already serializing the object that was passed to it!

Opening ILSpy on the DLL (yes I know it's open source - but I want the 'callers' functionality!) and moving up the call stack from SerializeConvertable to JsonSerializerInternalWriter.SerializeValue, the code that detects whether a converter should be used can be found right near the start:

if (((jsonConverter = ((member != null) ? member.Converter : null)) != null 
   || (jsonConverter = ((containerProperty != null) ? containerProperty.ItemConverter 
                                                    : null)) != null 
   || (jsonConverter = ((containerContract != null) ? containerContract.ItemConverter 
                                                    : null)) != null 
   || (jsonConverter = valueContract.Converter) != null 
   || (jsonConverter = 
       this.Serializer.GetMatchingConverter(valueContract.UnderlyingType)) != null 
   || (jsonConverter = valueContract.InternalConverter) != null) 
   && jsonConverter.CanWrite)
{
    this.SerializeConvertable(writer, jsonConverter, value, valueContract, 
                              containerContract, containerProperty);
    return;
}

Thankfully that very last condition in the if statement provides the solution to my issue: all I had to do was to add the following to either the base converter copied from the code in the linked SO in the question, or in the derived one:

public override bool CanWrite
{
    get
    {
        return false;
    }
}

And now it all works fine.

The upshot of this, however, is that if you intend to have some custom JSON serialization on an object and you are injecting it with a converter and you intend to fallback to the standard serialization mechanism under some or all situations; then you can't because you will fool the framework into thinking you're trying to store a circular reference.

I did try manipulating the ReferenceLoopHandling member, but if I told it to Ignore them then nothing was serialized and if I told it to save them, unsurprisingly, I got a stack overflow.

It's possible that this is a bug in Json.Net - alright it's so much of an edge-case that it's in danger of falling off the edge of the universe - but if you do find yourself in this situation then you're kind of stuck!

share|improve this answer
1  
I have to say this is not an edge case and there are a lot of threads related to this issue with custom JsonConverters. I appreciate the post. Thanks! –  GFXGunblade May 15 '13 at 21:28
    
This completely sucks. You have to manually try to embed the "$type" yourself, which the framework hides everything you need in private variables and classes, so you can't even use the serializer withing the WriteJson method of a JsonConverter. Terrible. –  Triynko Dec 10 '13 at 19:01
    
I wrote my own framework and it does things right. It allows you to read from or write to a dynamic object, and it handles embedding the type name and other special parameters outside the call. –  Triynko Dec 10 '13 at 19:03
    
+ 1. Thank god someone finally wrote what this was about legibly..I've been going back and forth between exceptions and serialization to nothing! –  dansan Feb 3 at 16:04
    
I can't upvote this enough. I've been having a problem with a self-referencing loop and combing StackOverflow for answers for the past week, and this is finally the answer I was looking for. –  mlefavor Apr 4 at 22:22

I just came across this myself and I was pulling my hair out in frustration!

To solve the issue, the following worked for me, but because I missed the CanWrite solution, it's a more complex workaround.

  • Create a copy of the existing class on which you're using your Converter and call it something different.
  • Remove the JsonConverter attribute on the copy.
  • Create a constructor on the new class which takes a parameter of the same type as the original class. Use the constructor to copy over any values which are required for later serialisation.
  • In your Converter's WriteJson method, convert the value into your dummy type, then serialise that type instead.

For instance, this is similar to my original class:

[JsonConverter(typeof(MyResponseConverter))]
public class MyResponse
{
    public ResponseBlog blog { get; set; }
    public Post[] posts { get; set; }
}

The copy looks like this:

public class FakeMyResponse
{
    public ResponseBlog blog { get; set; }
    public Post[] posts { get; set; }

    public FakeMyResponse(MyResponse response)
    {
        blog = response.blog;
        posts = response.posts;
    }
}

The WriteJson is:

public override void WriteJson(JsonWriter writer, object value,
    JsonSerializer serializer)
{
    if (CanConvert(value.GetType()))
    {
        FakeMyResponse response = new FakeMyResponse((MyResponse)value);
        serializer.Serialize(writer, response);
    }
}

Edit:

The OP pointed out that using an Expando could be another possible solution. This works well, saving the bother of creating the new class, although DLR support requires Framework 4.0 or later. The approach is to create a new dynamic ExpandoObject and then initialise its properties in the WriteJson method directly to create the copy, e.g.:

public override void WriteJson(JsonWriter writer, object value,
    JsonSerializer serializer)
{
    if (CanConvert(value.GetType()))
    {
        var response = (MyResponse)value;
        dynamic fake = new System.Dynamic.ExpandoObject();
        fake.blog = response.blog;
        fake.posts = response.posts;
        serializer.Serialize(writer, fake);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
that's a novel solution to the serious issue of when you really need to use both the converter and the standard serialization - since our JSON serializable objects tend to be light, having a copy isn't too bad in those situations. I guess, also, an Expando might work too. –  Andras Zoltan Sep 9 '12 at 7:19
    
The Expando solution is very elegant. I can see quite a few other places where it would be useful in my project. Thanks :) –  Dave R. Sep 9 '12 at 14:51
    
Oh yeah, except you completely lose the type information. That won't write a "$type" field to the object, so forget deserializing it as a typed object, especially if the target member is an interface and needs a solid type embedded. Also the framework hides everything you'd need to write the "$type" (let alone the object $id value) in private variables, making it next to impossible to embed such values yourself. The JSON.NET framework has serious design flaws; virtually unusable. –  Triynko Dec 10 '13 at 19:06
    
@Triynko - You can write a SerializationBinder to add a custom $type property: james.newtonking.com/archive/2011/11/19/… It wasn't required for this example. –  Dave R. Jul 8 at 10:12

I just had the same plroblem with Parent/Child collections and found that post which has solved my case. I Only wanted to show the List of parent collection items and didn't need any of the child data, therefore i use the following and it worked fine:

JsonConvert.SerializeObject(ResultGroups, Formatting.None,
                        new JsonSerializerSettings()
                        { 
                            ReferenceLoopHandling = ReferenceLoopHandling.Ignore
                        });

it also referes to the Json.NET codplex page at:

http://json.codeplex.com/discussions/272371

share|improve this answer
    
appreciate this, but this doesn't work in the case laid out in this particular question. –  Andras Zoltan Nov 25 '12 at 11:31
    
Sorry Andras, i thought the JsonSerializerSettings would help. –  Muhammad Omar Nov 25 '12 at 22:47

This might help someone, but in my case I was trying to override the Equals method to have my object be treated as value type. In my research, I found that JSON.NET doesn't like this:

JSON.NET Self Referencing Error

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.