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In JavaScript there are both Object literals and function literals.

Object literal:

myObject = {myprop:"myValue"}

Function literal:

myFunction = function() {
   alert("hello world");
}

What is the significance of the word literal? Can we say Java has method literals?

public void myMethod() {
    System.out.println("are my literal");
}
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You also have string/null/boolean/regexp/numerical/array literal. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Literal_%28computer_programming%29 –  some Sep 7 '12 at 9:54
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A function literal is just an expression that defines an unnamed function.

The syntax for a function literal is much like that of the function statement, except that it is used as an expression rather than as a statement and no function name is required.

So When you give the method name then it can't be a method literal.

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If functions were not literal in JavaScript they would always have to have a name. In Java methods are not "literal" because they always have a name. They can never be defined on the fly, pass around or passed into method. –  dublintech Sep 7 '12 at 9:37
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Don't compare JavaScript with Java, they have about as much in common as a bear and a whale. Java is an object oriented programming language, whereas JavaScript is a functional programming language.

With a functional language comes the notion of functions as first class objects: functions can be assigned to variables, can be passed as arguments as they can be the return value of other functions.

An object literal is an object you create on-the-fly and in-line. Same applies for a function literal. But the example you're giving is actually similar to a regular function declaration:

function foo()
{
    alert('bar');
}

Is moved to the top of the scope, where it is converted to:

var foo = function()
{
    alert('bar');
};

Makes sense, when functions can be passed as arguments/return values:

var processed = (function(someFunc)//<-- argument name
{
    return function()
    {
        alert('I\'ll call some function in 2 seconds, get ready');
        setTimeout(someFunc,2000);//<-- passes a reference to foo, as an argument to setTimeout
    }
})(foo);//pass reference to function object foo here

This is only the beginning of all sorts of things you can do with JS, provided you stop treating it as a subset of Java....

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The biggest difference is how/when it is parsed and used. Take your exemple,

myFunction = function() {
   alert("hello world");
}

You can only run myFunction() after the code got to there, since you declare a variable with an anonymous function.

If you use the other way,

function myFunction(){
   alert("hello world");
}

This function is declared at compile time and can be used anytime in the scope.

Please refer to this question also.

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