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This is what I have so far:

Veza.Open();
SqlCommand zadnjaN = new SqlCommand("SELECT TOP 1 id_n FROM Narudzba ORDER BY id_n DESC", Veza);
var id_zn = zadnjaN.ExecuteScalar(); //get 1 value for id_zn (last one entered)
List<int> proizvodi = new List<int>();
proizvodi = (List<int>)Session["kosarica"];
SqlCommand kupnja1 = new SqlCommand("INSERT INTO NarudzbaItemi ([narudzbaID], [proizvodID]) VALUES (@id_zn, @pro)", Veza);
for (int i = 0; i < proizvodi.Count; i++)
{
  kupnja1.Parameters.AddWithValue("pro", proizvodi[i]); //also tried @pro
  kupnja1.Parameters.AddWithValue("id_zn", id_zn); //@id_zn
  kupnja1.ExecuteNonQuery();
}
Veza.Close();

I get a message saying that variable name @pro has allready been declared. The point is, I need to insert a list of int items into column proizvodID, and however many times I insert a value in that column I need to insert an unchanging value that many times in column narudzbaID, which I get from a different table as the last value added. All 3 columns are int, and Session is List int. Using asp.net, c#, sql server 2008.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here how you can do this. But John Saunders's method is better I think

    for (int i = 0; i < proizvodi.Count; i++)
    {
        //Add this line to clear parameters
        kupnja1.Parameters.Clear();
        kupnja1.Parameters.AddWithValue("pro", proizvodi[i]); //also tried @pro
        kupnja1.Parameters.AddWithValue("id_zn", id_zn); //@id_zn
        kupnja1.ExecuteNonQuery();
    }
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You keep adding parameters in the loop. On the second iteration, @pro is already defined.

Try this:

Veza.Open();
object id_zn; //get 1 value for id_zn (last one entered)
using (SqlCommand zadnjaN = new SqlCommand("SELECT TOP 1 id_n FROM Narudzba ORDER BY id_n DESC", Veza))
{
    id_zn = zadnjaN.ExecuteScalar();
}
List<int> proizvodi = (List<int>)Session["kosarica"];
using (SqlCommand kupnja1 = new SqlCommand("INSERT INTO NarudzbaItemi ([narudzbaID], [proizvodID]) VALUES (@id_zn, @pro)", Veza))
{
    kupnja1.Parameters.Add("pro"); 
    kupnja1.Parameters.Add("id_zn");
    for (int i = 0; i < proizvodi.Count; i++)
    {
        kupnja1.Parameters["pro"].Value = proizvodi[i]; //also tried @pro
        kupnja1.Parameters["id_zn"].Value = id_zn; //@id_zn
        kupnja1.ExecuteNonQuery();
    }
}
Veza.Close();
share|improve this answer
    
You can still use addwithValue for id_zn, no ? –  Raphaël Althaus Sep 7 '12 at 9:15
    
@RaphaëlAlthaus: true, but why bother? Consistency is better. –  John Saunders Sep 7 '12 at 9:16
    
Well, this is a point of view. On another hand, the other way helps to understand what change and what doesn't. Anyway, really detail... –  Raphaël Althaus Sep 7 '12 at 9:17
    
@RaphaëlAlthaus: "what changed"? Once the code is written, this will not be a "change". Code for the steady state (most of the time). –  John Saunders Sep 7 '12 at 9:18
    
I just mean : when I have two vars. 1 has a value which change in a loop, the other will be the same for all the loop's iterations : I assign the non-changing var's value outside of the loop. –  Raphaël Althaus Sep 7 '12 at 9:20

It's basically saying you can't keep reusing the same command, this should work, moving the declaration into the loop:

    Veza.Open();
    SqlCommand zadnjaN = new SqlCommand("SELECT TOP 1 id_n FROM Narudzba ORDER BY id_n DESC", Veza);
    var id_zn = zadnjaN.ExecuteScalar(); //get 1 value for id_zn (last one entered)
    List<int> proizvodi = new List<int>();
    proizvodi = (List<int>)Session["kosarica"];

    for (int i = 0; i < proizvodi.Count; i++)
    {
        SqlCommand kupnja1 = new SqlCommand("INSERT INTO NarudzbaItemi ([narudzbaID], [proizvodID]) VALUES (@id_zn, @pro)", Veza);
        kupnja1.Parameters.AddWithValue("pro", proizvodi[i]); //also tried @pro
        kupnja1.Parameters.AddWithValue("id_zn", id_zn); //@id_zn
        kupnja1.ExecuteNonQuery();
    }
    Veza.Close();
share|improve this answer
    
-1: if you're going to put the command instantiation in the loop, then you for sure must dispose of the command when done! –  John Saunders Sep 7 '12 at 9:14
    
@John And -1 to you too, I'll correct SQL injection but I don't lecture new programmers about using using, it's not necessary to get the program working, just good practice. The guy's asking about the basics, why overwhelm him? –  mattmanser Sep 7 '12 at 9:45
    
using is basic, especially in a loop. Be careful about the code you post: people copy it. –  John Saunders Sep 7 '12 at 14:33
    
@John Go test it. C# can easily handle you not using using on SqlCommand. Just like you rarely put a using on an entity connection. It's not a massive problem. SqlConnection is the actually important one. It's as dogmatic as saying that you should always use StringBuilder. Go have a peek in reflector if you're still doubting disposing a SqlCommand isn't particularly important. There's no for sure about it. –  mattmanser Sep 7 '12 at 14:46
    
In my frequently-expressed opinion, it's for sure that it's better to get developers in the habit of implementing using blocks because they will get into situations where they start getting strange errors because of failing to do so. No need to discuss this any further, you're not being singled out - I've done this to many people before you. –  John Saunders Sep 7 '12 at 14:52

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