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The board is int[][] and I would like to find this shape

  1
    1
    1

with all 4 of it's symmetric (rotational) variants from the board and log the positions. e.g.

      ...
      ...
  ... x x x x x x ...
  ... x x 1 1 x x ...
  ... x 1 x x x x ...
  ... x x x x x x ...
      ...
      ...

Is it better to use F# to deal with these kinds of problems?

Below is my c# code for checking patterns vertically only (the code to check horizontally is simillar)

    List<Position> GetMatchVertical(int reelID)
    {
        List<Position> ret = new List<Position>();

        var myReel = board[reelID];
        var leftReel = reelID - 1 >= 0 ? board[reelID - 1] : null;
        var rightReel = reelID + 1 < boardSize ? board[reelID + 1] : null;

        int currentColor = myReel[0];

        for (int reelPosition = 1; reelPosition < boardSize; reelPosition++)
        {
            int nextColor = myReel[reelPosition];
            if (currentColor == nextColor)
            {
                if (leftReel!=null)
                {
                    if (reelPosition + 1 < boardSize && leftReel[reelPosition + 1] == currentColor)
                    {
                        ret.Add(logPosition(...));
                    }
                }
                if (rightReel!=null)
                {
                    if (reelPosition - 2 >= 0 && rightReel[reelPosition - 2] == currentColor)
                    {
                        ret.Add(logPosition(...));
                    }
                }
            }
            else
            {
                currentColor = nextColor;
            }
        }

        return ret;
    }
share|improve this question
    
Are you writing a clicker for puzzle game? –  Dmytro Tsiniavskyi Sep 7 '12 at 10:23
    
It certainly sounds like a functional language would be a better fit. –  Davin Tryon Sep 7 '12 at 10:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 15 down vote accepted

This is definitely a great fit for functional programming and F#. There is a large number of possible approaches. I think the solution by pad is probably the most direct one and it is a really good starting point. If you need something more general, then the solution by Huusom is quite nice.

There is even more general approach, which is to build a domain specific language (DSL) for detecting patterns in an array. This is more advanced functional technique, but it works really nicely for your example. If you did that, then you could express quite complex patterns in a really concise way. Here is an example:

// Create a detector that tests if a location
// contains 1 and returns 'false' when out of range
let one = border false (equals 1)

// A shape detector for your pattern
let pattern = 
  around (0, 0) one <&> around (1, 0) one <&> 
  around (-1, 1) one

// Test pattern with any rotation: Combine 
// 4 possible rotations with logical or.
let any = 
  pattern <|> rotate pattern <|> 
  rotate (rotate pattern) <|> 
  rotate (rotate (rotate pattern))

This sample uses various primitives to build a declarative specification of the pattern. The value any represents a function that you can run to test whether the pattern occurs at a given location. It handles all rotations of the pattern and it also does bounds checks. You'd also need to add mirrored patterns, but that would be quite easy extension.

Explaining the implementation would probably need a full blog post, but here is a commented source code that should be quite readable:

/// A type that represents a function that tests
/// whether an array contains some pattern at a 
/// specified location. It gets the location to 
/// test & the array as arguments and returns bool.
type ShapeDetector = SD of (int -> int -> int[,] -> bool)

/// A primitive that tests whether the value at the
/// current location contains a value 'v'
let equals v = SD (fun x y arr -> arr.[x,y] = v)

/// A combinator that takes 'ShapeDetector' and 
/// creates a new one that returns 'def' when 
/// accessing outside of the array bounds
let border def (SD f) = SD (fun x y arr -> 
  if x < 0 || y < 0 || x >= arr.GetLength(0) || y >= arr.GetLength(1) 
  then def else f x y arr)

/// A combinator that calls a given ShapeDetector
/// at a location specified by offset dx, dy
let around (dx, dy) (SD f) = SD (fun x y arr ->
  f (x + dx) (y + dy) arr)

/// A combinator that takes a ShapeDetector and
/// builds a new one, which is rotated by 90 degrees
let rotate (SD f) = SD (fun x y arr ->
  f -y x arr)

/// Creates a shape detector that succeeds only
/// when both of the arguments succeed.
let (<&>) (SD f1) (SD f2) = SD (fun x y arr ->
  f1 x y arr && f2 x y arr)

/// Creates a shape detector that succeeds 
/// when either of the arguments succeed.
let (<|>) (SD f1) (SD f2) = SD (fun x y arr ->
  f1 x y arr || f2 x y arr)

Finally, here is an example that runs the pattern detector on a sample 2D array:

// Create a 2D array as a sample input
let inp = 
  array2D [ [ 0; 0; 1 ]
            [ 0; 1; 0 ]
            [ 0; 1; 0 ] ]

// Get the underlying function and run it
// for all possible indices in the array
let (SD f) = any
for x in 0 .. 2 do
  for y in 0 .. 2 do
    printfn "%A %A" (x, y) (f x y inp)
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, F# is funky and very foreign... –  Maxim Gershkovich Sep 11 '12 at 2:54
    
Is there any reason (beside cleaner code) to use a union case instead of a type alias for ShapeDetector? –  Huusom Sep 11 '12 at 8:28
    
@Huusom I used a single-case union to define a new named type. As a type alias, the F# type checker would not clearly distinguish the function type and the ShapeDetector type, so it would show less useful information. –  Tomas Petricek Sep 13 '12 at 21:47
    
@MaximGershkovich F# has many different sides. The one I used here is quite funky and functional (but efficient in some cases!) Many other sides of F# are less funky and more close to C# or other more common styles. –  Tomas Petricek Sep 13 '12 at 21:48

You can find horizontal shapes using pattern matching in F# like this (do similarly for vertical shapes):

/// Try to match with horizontal shapes
/// 1 x x  and 1 1 x
/// x 1 1      x x 1
///
/// 1 1 x and x x 1
/// x x 1     1 1 x
/// could be found by reversing matched sub-arrays 
let matchHorizontalShapes (board: _ [] []) =
    let positions = ResizeArray()
    for i in 0..board.Length - 2 do
        for j in 0..board.[0].Length - 3 do
            match [|board.[i].[j..j+2];
                    board.[i+1].[j..j+2]|] with
            | [|[|1; 1; _|];
                [|_; 1; 1|]|] -> positions.Add((i, j), (i+1, j+1), (i+1, j+2))
                                 positions.Add((i, j), (i, j+1), (i+1, j+2))
            | [|[|1; _; _|];
                [|_; 1; 1|]|] -> positions.Add((i, j), (i+1, j+1), (i+1, j+2))
            | [|[|1; 1; _|];
                [|_; _; 1|]|] -> positions.Add((i, j), (i, j+1), (i+1, j+2))
            | _ -> ()
    positions.ToArray()
share|improve this answer

If you create a set of coordinat offsets based on the pattern then you can get the values and match the result to a known set of values.

let find_matches board pattern = 
    let xb = Array2D.length1 board 
    let yb = Array2D.length2 board

    // safe lookup on board
    let get_value= function
        | (x, _) when (x < 0) || (x >= xb) -> None
        | (_, y) when (y < 0) || (y >= yb) -> None
        | (x, y) -> Some (Array2D.get board x y)

    // do a patten match on board.
    let has_pattern = function
        | [Some 1; Some 1; Some 1] -> true 
        | _ -> false

    // se if a given coordinate is a match 
    let is_match (x,y) =
        pattern 
            |> List.map (fun (x',y') -> (x+x', y+y'))   // expand the coordinat to a list of coordinates
            |> List.map get_value                       // find the values coordinates
            |> has_pattern                              // match to pattern

    [for x in 0..(xb-1) do for y in 0..(yb-1) -> x, y]
        |> List.filter is_match

This functions works with a pattern of [(0,0); (1, -1); (1, -2)] (your example from above).

Please note I use an Array2D (int[,]) instead of int[][] given in your example.

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