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I am coding something to decompose a number in binary on a training site. I have test it a hundred of times on my local compiler, it works just fine, but the training site tells me there are errors.

(My code is nor elegant nor efficient, especially the loop but I decomposed the code to understand where the error could be). Could anybody tell me if there is an error ?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>


//function that displays the greatest power of 2 less than a fixed number N
int residu(int N)

{
    int i;
    int M=2;
    for(i=0;i<N;i++){
        if(M>N){break;}else{M=2*M;i++;}
    }
    return M/2;
}


int main()
{
    int i;

    //N is the input to decompose
    int N;
    scanf("%d",&N);
    //We will search for the greatest power of 2 less than a fixed number N, 
    //than repeating the some process with the residue of N with the greatest power of 2        //less than N, so we have to store the value of N for the loop (see below) we will use to work //correctly
    int M;
    M=N;
    //D displays the diffrence betwenn two successive powers of 2 that appears in the    //binary decomposition, (we will then print "O")
    int D;
    D=log(residu(N))/log(2);

        for(i=0;i<M;i++){
            //If N==residu(N), the decomposition is finished
            if(N==residu(N)){printf("1");int k;
                for(k=0;k<D;k++){printf("0");}break;}
            else{
             // N is a the residue of the former value of N and the greatest power of 2 //less than N
                N=N-residu(N);
                D=D-log(residu(N))/log(2);
                printf("1");
                int k;
                for(k=0;k<D-1;k++){printf("0");
                }
                D=log(residu(N))/log(2);
            }        
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Pray tell - What are those errors? –  Ed Heal Sep 7 '12 at 10:44
    
What are the errors? –  Flavio Sep 7 '12 at 10:45
    
And the training site does not tell you anything more specific than just "there are errors"? –  undur_gongor Sep 7 '12 at 10:46
    
I have strictly no idea, it tells me that my code outputs 110 instead of 1010 but I tried it on 10 and I have the right result ! And there are two warnings : "warning: implicit declaration of function 'log' line 30: warning: incompatible implicit declaration of built-in function 'log'" –  user1611830 Sep 7 '12 at 10:47
4  
@user1611830 - Those warnings are for a reason. Guess that may be the source of your problems. –  Ed Heal Sep 7 '12 at 10:49

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is a typical problem of floating point calculations. The function log works with floats.

log(8) / log(2) is being calculated as 2.999... which is then truncated to 2 when being converted to int.

That's why you are getting wrong results. And the exact behavior is compiler/machine dependent. For further reading see e.g. Goldberg.

It is in general a bad idea to mix integer and floating point calculations that way. Your function residu should report back the exact binary logarithm. Or you implement a dedicated function for calculating the log in integer, something like

unsigned binlog(unsigned n) {
    unsigned i = 0;
    while (n > 1) { n /= 2; ++i; }
    return i;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot, it worked fine. I choose the second alternative. But what do you lean by the exact binary logarithm ? Is it possible to use the native log function ? –  user1611830 Sep 7 '12 at 13:30
1  
The "native" log function (you should have used log2 btw.) calculates a float value approximating the logarithm (not exact). Since you need the exact value of the binary log of a power of 2, log is not suitable. With integer arithmetic you can calculate exact logarithms for the powers of the base (not an approximation). –  undur_gongor Sep 7 '12 at 13:39

You need to include the math library

#include <math.h>
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As already mentioned you are missing the include of mathematical library:

#include <math.h>

Also, there is an error in that this program won't work for input "0".

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Yes in fact I added this peculiar case, but I didn't want to make the code I edited too big –  user1611830 Sep 7 '12 at 11:16

Try the following fixes:

1) include math.h for the log functions

#include <math.h>

2) Declare all variables at the top of each function (or at the top of each scope within each function), ie:

int main() {  
int i;      
//N is the input to decompose
int N;
int M;
//D displays the diffrence betwenn two successive powers of 2 that appears in the
//binary decomposition, (we will then print "O") 
int D;
...
if(N==residu(N)){int k;printf("1");
...
else{  
   int k; 

3) Return something from main. It's of return type "int" so add a

return 0;

4) if that still doesn't do it, you could try explicitly type casting the return of these statements:

D=log(residu(N))/log(2);
D=D-log(residu(N))/log(2);
D=log(residu(N))/log(2);

They throw a warning about loss of data taking a double result and storing it in an int.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you I am going to try it –  user1611830 Sep 7 '12 at 11:19
1  
Regarding item 2: Since 1999, you can mix statements and declarations in C (although it is considered bad practice by some). This is certainly not the problem here. –  undur_gongor Sep 7 '12 at 11:28
    
@undur_gongor - We (at least I) don't know what compiler the "training site" uses, nor do we know the options on it. gcc is OK with it, but if, for example, you use MS 2010 express it will actually bomb out having the declarations after the operations. Since we don't have the details of what's going wrong, it's better to be safe then sorry. –  Mike Sep 7 '12 at 11:33

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