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I wrote a code in AS3 which allowed me to check if a particular number of things were true...

If (true + false + true + true + false + true + true < 4)
{

}

When i tried rewriting in C#, it tells me i cannot add type bool and bool. Is the best way of doing this to rewrite it like this? Or is there some simpler work around?

If ((true?1:0) + (false?1:0) + (true?1:0) + (true?1:0) + (false?1:0) + (true?1:0) + (true?1:0) < 4)
{

}
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marked as duplicate by sloth, Fiona Taylor Gorringe, Dirk, curtisk, explunit Jul 10 '13 at 15:07

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
public int ToInt(bool b) {return b ? 1 : 0;} –  L.B Sep 7 '12 at 11:22
    
@L.B: ToInt exists as Convert.ToInt32 –  Porges Sep 7 '12 at 11:33
    

6 Answers 6

up vote 43 down vote accepted

Try using IEnumerable<T>.Count(Func<T,bool>) from System.Linq, with T as bool, on a params method parameter.

public static int CountTrue(params bool[] args)
{
   return args.Count(t => t);
}

Usage

int count = CountTrue(false, true, false, true, true); // Will return 3
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1  
Nice one! Very clean and elegant code! –  Mithrandir Sep 7 '12 at 11:25
1  
That's beautiful :') Thanks, this is just what i'll use! –  Randomman159 Sep 7 '12 at 11:33
3  
+1 Yeah, nice idea using params –  sloth Sep 7 '12 at 11:35

You could create an array and use Count:

if ((new []{true, false, true, true, false, true, true}).Count(x=>x) < 4)
{

}

or the Sum method:

if ((new []{true, false, true, true, false, true, true}).Sum(x=>x?1:0) < 4)
{

}
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If i were using it as a one off, this is how i'd do it, thanks heaps for replying upvotes –  Randomman159 Sep 7 '12 at 11:36
    
Thanks! This was my favorite approach. I had a few bools I needed to add like this, and (new[] {var1, var2, var3, var4}).Sum(x => x ? 1 : 0); worked great for me! –  statue Oct 2 '13 at 15:32

Here's a more fun example:

if ((BoolCount)true + false + true + true + false + true + true <= 5)
{
    Console.WriteLine("yay");
}

Using this class:

struct BoolCount
{
    private readonly int c;
    private BoolCount(int c) { this.c = c; }

    public static implicit operator BoolCount(bool b)
        { return new BoolCount(Convert.ToInt32(b)); }

    public static implicit operator int(BoolCount me)
        { return me.c; }

    public static BoolCount operator +(BoolCount me, BoolCount other)
        { return new BoolCount(me.c + other.c); }
}
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1  
Ha! Totally fun, indeed! +1 –  sloth Sep 7 '12 at 11:35

Convert.ToInt32(true) + Convert.ToInt32(false) + Convert.ToInt32(true) also work in this case i think this is simplest way we have

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what you tink about it –  Gyan Chandra Srivastava Sep 7 '12 at 11:27

(Inspired by L.B.:s comment) you could write an extension method:

static class Ex
{
    public static int Int(this bool x) { return x ? 1 : 0; }
}

And then (provided you include a using to the namespace containing the Ex class), you can write your if statement like this:

if (true.Int() + false.Int() + true.Int() + true.Int() + 
    false.Int() + true.Int() + true.Int() < 4)
{
    ...
}
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You could write an extension method for the BitArray class. I'm not sure if the performance would be any better than using Linq, but at least its another option:

public static int CountSetBits(this BitArray theBitArray)
{
   int count = 0;
   for (int i = 0; i < theBitArray.Count; i++)
   {
      count += (theBitArray.Get(i)) ? 1 : 0;
   }
   return count; 
}

Usage:

BitArray barray = new BitArray(new [] { true, true, false, true });
int count = barray.CountSetBits(); // Will return 3
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