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I am using GNU Scientific Library in my C++ project. For convience, I would like to trasparently wrap gsl_vector* in a C++ class (to add a bunch of domain specific functions and to simplify interface). But I am getting perplexed with how to deal with const gsl_vector*. Let me explain. Let me start with this minimalistic wrapper.

class Vector {
  gsl_vector* vector_;
public:
  Vector(gsl_vector* vector): vector_(vector) {}
  double& operator()(int i) {
    return *gsl_vector_ptr(vector_, i);
  }
};

Suppose, further, that I have two functions. One is defined as follows:

int f(Vector& x) {
  \\ do some math, e.g. x(0) = 0.0;
  return 0;
}

Another one is a callback function that has to use GSL types, and is defined as follows:

int gsl_f(gsl_vector* x) {
  Vector xx(x);
  return f(xx);
}

This works fine. Now, suppose the callback has a constant signature:

int gsl_f(const gsl_vector* x);

Then I can redefine my Vector class and my f function accordingly:

class Vector {
  const gsl_vector* vector_;
public:
  Vector(const gsl_vector* vector): vector_(vector) {}
  const double& operator()(int i) const {
    return *gsl_vector_const_ptr(vector_, i);
  }
};

int f(const Vector& x) {
  \\ do some math 
  return 0;
}

Also works. Now, I want my wrapper class to suit both situations. For example, I want to be able to do the following, preserving the safety of const:

int f(const Vector& x, Vector& y) {
  \\ do some math 
  return 0;
}

int gsl_f(const gsl_vector* x, gsl_vector* y) {
  Vector yy(y);
  return f(x, yy);
}

I can do it by having a Vector with two pointers, const and non-const, and remembering whether it was initialized from a const or non-const member. My question is, can I do it without runtime checks? After all, all the information is there at the compile time.

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I suspect this is not possible for the same reason there are two distinct types of iterators - iterator and const_iterator in standard containers. There is a semantic difference between "const wrapper of object" and "wrapper of const object". –  Fiktik Sep 7 '12 at 12:22
    
Just discovered that while simplifying my code to make a clear example I did a mistake. The first situation (with non-const wrapper) does not work. Going back to check things... –  Andrei Sep 7 '12 at 13:18
    
Corrected two small mistakes, so the example compiles now. –  Andrei Sep 7 '12 at 13:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Proposal (not wonderful, but should work):

class Vector { 
  gsl_vector* vector_;
  const gsl_vector* const_vector_; 
public: 
  Vector(const gsl_vector* vector): vector_(nullptr), const_vector_(vector) {} 
  Vector(gsl_vector* vector): vector_(vector), const_vector_(vector) {}
  const double& operator()(int i) const { 
    return *gsl_vector_ptr(const_vector_, i); 
  } 
  double& operator () (int i) {
    return *gsl_vector_ptr(vector_, i);
  }
}; 

Second possibility:

class Vector { 
private:
  gsl_vector* vector_;

  Vector(gsl_vector* vector): vector_(vector) {}

public:
  static const Vector* Create (const gsl_vector* vector) {
     return new Vector (const_cast<Vector *> vector);
  }

  static Vector* Create (gsl_vector* vector) {
     return new Vector (vector);
  }

  const double& operator()(int i) const { 
    return *gsl_vector_ptr(vector_, i); 
  } 
  double& operator () (int i) {
    return *gsl_vector_ptr(vector_, i);
  }
}; 
share|improve this answer
    
Indeed, the first example goes along my earlier thoughts that a runtime implementation is possible (but I guess you meant vector_(nullptr), const_vector_(vector) ). The second example disables const-safety mechanism. Thanks for the post, I will think a bit more, but the runtime checking (e.g. segfault when dereferencing a null pointer) looks most pragmatic so far. –  Andrei Sep 7 '12 at 15:10
    
Sorry yes, I've edited it. Since everything "unsafe" is private, the second example does not cause safety issues outside the wrapper class. Note that you won't get a segfault in any case, since you cannot call the non-const overload of operator () for const objects. –  JohnB Sep 7 '12 at 16:00
    
Speaking of the second example, I can still instantiate it from a const gsl_vector* and then modify. Of course, the scope for such a mistake is limited to gsl_f and the like. But than I can also recast the pointer explicity in gsl_f itself. –  Andrei Sep 7 '12 at 16:44

Combining both classes should work as expected, have you tried it?

class Vector {
  gsl_vector* vector_;
public:
  Vector(gsl_vector* vector): vector_(vector) {}

  const double& operator()(int i) const {
    return *gsl_vector_ptr(vector_, i);
  }
  double& operator()(int i) {
    return *gsl_vector_ptr(vector_, i);
  }

  operator const_Vector()
  { 
    return const_Vector(vector_);
  }

};


class const_Vector {
  const gsl_vector* vector_;
public:
  const_Vector(const gsl_vector* vector): vector_(vector) {}

  const double& operator()(int i) const {
    return *gsl_vector_ptr(vector_, i);
  }
};

Function signature needs to look this way:

int f(const_Vector& x, Vector& y) {
  \\ do some math 
  return 0;
}

This followes a similar scheme like the iterator and const_iterator.

Maybe you have a situation which this will not work,. you should post this situation and we can try to solve it.

share|improve this answer
    
Won't work. You need two constructors, and probably two data fields, a constant and a non-constant one. –  JohnB Sep 7 '12 at 12:07
    
just thought about it, you are right, edited my answer ... now the Vector is convertible to a const_vector. Maybe Andrei should thing this direction. –  Sven Sep 7 '12 at 12:12
    
This is essentially having two separate classes (as Fiktik noted earlier). Being able to obtain a const_Vector from a Vector does not help with respect to f's signature. –  Andrei Sep 7 '12 at 14:00
    
In my case the signature is important, because f uses a whole system of other functions that are based on Vector& and const Vector& and obviously I do not want to go through the whole code and change const Vector& to const_Vector&. Is it indeed the only way? @Sven –  Andrei Sep 7 '12 at 14:09
    
The only solution I see, which do not use any const casts, which may raise some other hard to find errors if you make a programming mistake, may be to make Vector convertible to const_Vector but not const_Vector to Vector, so you can serve all cases with these two implementations. The solution with 2 different vectors inside are not necessary in such a case. The only thing you should think of, is how often are these functions called. Somehow, the compiler will compile the conversion away, but not garanteed. You should write a benchmark to check this, if it may be an issue. –  Sven Sep 7 '12 at 20:31

You can also use some kind of inheritance with pointer to data. further - templates can be used to create overloaded function returning either one or second version depending on input pointer types.

class JSONChannelFullConfigConst:
        public JSONObjectRenderer {
public:
    JSONChannelFullConfigConst(const uint8_t * channel_id,
                               const sensors_single_channel_config_t * cfg) :
                    j_channel_id(channel_id),
                    j_cfg(cfg) {

    }

private:
    const uint8_t * const j_channel_id;
    const sensors_single_channel_config_t * const j_cfg;
    void renderFields(rlf::UcOstreamBase& os) const;
    public:
    uint8_t getId() const {
        return *j_channel_id;
    }
};

class JSONChannelFullConfig:
        public JSONChannelFullConfigConst,
        public JSONObjectParser {
public:
    JSONChannelFullConfig(uint8_t * channel_id, sensors_single_channel_config_t * cfg) :
                    JSONChannelFullConfigConst(channel_id, cfg),
                    j_channel_id(channel_id),
                    j_cfg(cfg) {

    }
    void setId(uint8_t id) {
        *j_channel_id = id;
    }
private:
    uint8_t * const j_channel_id;
    sensors_single_channel_config_t * const j_cfg;

    virtual bool parseNameValuePair(const char * name, rlf::UcIstream & value);
};
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