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According to the JLS, an int array should be filled by zeros just after initialization. However, I am faced with a situation where it is not. Such a behavior occurs first in JDK 7u4 and also occurs in all later updates (I use 64-bit implementation). The following code throws exception:

public static void main(String[] args) {
        int[] a;
        int n = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < 100000000; ++i) {
            a = new int[10];
            for (int f : a)
                if (f != 0)
                  throw new RuntimeException("Array just after allocation: "+ Arrays.toString(a));
            Arrays.fill(a, 0);
            for (int j = 0; j < a.length; ++j)
                a[j] = (n - j)*i;
            for (int f : a)
                n += f;
        }
        System.out.println(n);
    }

The exception occurs after the JVM performs compilation of the code block and does not arise with -Xint flag. Additionally, the Arrays.fill(...) statement (as all other statements in this code) is necessary, and the exception does not occurs if it is absent. It is clear that this possible bug is bounded with some JVM optimization. Any ideas for the reason of such a behavior?

Update:
I see this behavior on HotSpot 64-bit server VM, Java version from 1.7.0_04 to 1.7.0_10 on Gentoo Linux, Debian Linux (both kernel 3.0 version) and MacOS Lion. This error can always be reproduced with the code above. I did not test this problem with a 32-bit JDK or on Windows. I already sent a bug report to the Oracle (bug id 7196857) and it will appear in public Oracle bug database in few days.

Update:
Oracle published this bug at their public bug database: http://bugs.sun.com/bugdatabase/view_bug.do?bug_id=7196857

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15  
I'd say bug in the implementation if it's not following the spec –  Petesh Sep 7 '12 at 12:04
12  
Since you have a well-defined example that reliably reproduces the problem (at least on some platforms), have you considered filing a bug? –  Joachim Sauer Sep 7 '12 at 12:23
4  
Yes, you should most definitely file a bug report. This is a very serious bug! –  Hot Licks Sep 7 '12 at 12:29
7  
Yes, I have already sent a bug report to the Oracle (bug id 7196857) and it will appear in public Oracle bug database in few days. –  Stanislav Poslavsky Sep 7 '12 at 12:34
6  
I tried it with Java 7 update 7 64-bit on Windows and it didn't have a problem. –  Peter Lawrey Sep 7 '12 at 13:12
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2 Answers

up vote 40 down vote accepted

Here we are faced with a bug in the JIT-compiler. Compiler determines that the allocated array is filled after allocation in Arrays.fill(...), but the check for uses between the allocation and the fill is faulty. So, compiler performs an illegal optimization - it skips zeroing of allocated array.

This bug is placed in Oracle bug tracker (bug id 7196857). Unfortunately, I did not wait for any clarifications from Oracle about the following points. As I see, this bug is OS-specific: it absolutely reproducible on 64-bit Linux and Mac, but, as I see from comments, it reproduces not regularly on Windows (for similar versions of JDK). Additionally it would be nice to know when this bug will be fixed.

There is only advice at the moment: do not use JDK1.7.0_04 or later if you depend on JLS for newly declared arrays.

Update at October 5:

In the new Build 10 of the JDK 7u10 (early access) released at October 04, 2012, this bug was fixed at least for Linux OS (I did not test for other). Thanks to @Makoto, who found that this bug is no longer available for public access in Oracle bug database. Unfortunately, I do not know for the reasons Oracle removed it from public access, but it is available in Google cache. Also, this bug has caught the attention of Redhat: the CVE identifiers CVE-2012-4420 (bugzilla) and CVE-2012-4416 (bugzilla) were assigned to this flaw.

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2  
The bug ID is now invalid - could you look into this? –  Makoto Sep 21 '12 at 15:52
1  
@Makoto I am confused, since this bug was in bug database yesterday. I do not know for the reason Oracle removed this bug from the public access. But Google remember webcache.googleusercontent.com/… Additionally this bug was also placed in RedHat bug database, since it can lead to a CVE bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=856124 –  Stanislav Poslavsky Sep 21 '12 at 21:08
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I made some change in your code. It's not a problem of Integer overflow. See the code, it throws an exception at runtime

    int[] a;
    int n = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < 100000000; ++i) {
        a = new int[10];
        for (int f : a) {
            if (f != 0) {
                throw new RuntimeException("Array just after allocation: " + Arrays.toString(a));
            }
        }
        for (int ii = 0, len = a.length; ii < len; ii++)
            a[ii] = 0;
        for (int j = 0; j < a.length; ++j)
            a[j] = Integer.MAX_VALUE - 1;
        for (int j = 0; j < a.length; ++j)
            n++;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
What is your OS? –  Stanislav Poslavsky Sep 9 '12 at 10:41
    
Windows 7 64 bit. Jdk 64 bit 1.7.0_07 –  Roberto Mereghetti Sep 9 '12 at 11:57
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