Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following code :

try
{
    HAS::TCPServerSocket servSock(echoServPort);    // Socket descriptor for server
    std::vector<HAS::TCPSocket*> sockets(MAXCONN);
    for (;;)
    {
        try
        {
            if (socketCount < MAXCONN)
            {
                HAS::TCPSocket* sock(servSock.accept());
                sockets.push_back(sock);
                std::thread handler(handleTCPClient, std::ref(sockets[socketCount++]));
                handler.detach();
            }
        }
        catch (...)
        {
            cerr << "Unable to create thread" << endl;
            exit(1);
        }
    }
}

I want to keep track of a limited number of connections (MAXCONN=4) and would like to keep track of opened sockets using a std::vector. Somehow, when I use the above code the sock variable gets properly set to the current socket as accepted by servSock.accept(). However, when I try to push the sock variable onto the std::vector I loose the sock object.

I have a feeling it has to do with properly specifying a copy and/or move constructor but I have defined both (and used breakpoints to see when the would be called) but they don't seem to get called at all.

share|improve this question
    
std::vector<HAS::TCPSocket*> sockets(MAXCONN); This should initialized your vector to have a max-size of 4 ? ... Thats not how vectors are supposed to work. –  Alex Sep 7 '12 at 12:49
    
When socketCount has reached the maximal size, your program will just busy-loop. That looks like a terrible idea. Also, when will socketCount ever be decremented? –  Kerrek SB Sep 7 '12 at 12:52
2  
std::vector<HAS::TCPSocket*> sockets(MAXCONN); will initialize your vector to contain four null pointers, it won't do anything with a max size. –  Dirk Holsopple Sep 7 '12 at 12:54
    
Welcome to Stack Overflow! –  Joseph Quinsey Sep 28 '12 at 3:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

References to vector elements are invalidated when you say push_back. You can't use the code the way you have. You must first populate the entire vector and then never touch it again. Alternatively, use a container whose element references aren't invalidated by container mutations (list or multiset or unordered_multiset for general purpose, deque for insertion/deletion at the ends).

Or just pass a copy of the pointer to the thread?!

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the help ; std::list seems to work fine. Also I tried passing the pointer to the thread before - I think that would be the best way to go about it, however I couldn't get it to work. Will try again :) –  QNimbus Sep 7 '12 at 12:50
    
@QNimbus: Your code has lots of other issues. I don't see why passing a copy wouldn't work, and that's by far the easiest and most appropriate solution. –  Kerrek SB Sep 7 '12 at 12:52
1  
@QNimbus: Consider following the advice in the last line, as it is better than the rest of the answer. You hold a pointer to a socket, just copy the pointer, there is no need to hold references to pointers for no particular reason (unless you need the thread to modify the pointer?). –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 7 '12 at 13:03
std::vector<HAS::TCPSocket*> sockets(MAXCONN);
...
sockets.push_back(sock);
std::thread handler(handleTCPClient, std::ref(sockets[socketCount++]));

That code looks funny. The vector will hold 4 null pointers, followed by the actual pointers that are added at the end with the push_back() calls. The threads will then get references to the first null pointers rather than the actual pointers you want.

You can do one of two things: my suggestion would be to use the default constructor of a vector and then call reserve() to guarantee that there won't be reallocations that invalidate the iterators with the push_backs. That would solve the problem. Alternatively, you can create the vector with the elements, but then don't call push_back() but rather use operator[] to modify the element at position socketCount.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.