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I have an abstract base class and an implementation class like:

public abstract class Base
{
   public Base getInstance( Class<? extends Base> clazz )
   {
      //expected to return a singleton instance of clazz's class
   }

   public abstract absMeth();
}

public A extends Base
{
    //expected to be a singleton
}

In this example I can make A to be a singleton and even write getInstance in Base to return a singleton object of A for every call, doing this way:

public abstract class Base
{
   public Base getInstance( Class<? extends Base> clazz )
   {
      try
      {
         return clazz.getDeclaredMethod("getInstance").invoke(null,null);
      }
   }

   public abstract void absMeth();
}

public A extends Base
{
    private static A inst;

    private A(){}

    public static A getInstance( )
    {
       if( inst!= null)
            inst = new A();
       return inst; 
    }

    public void absMeth(){
      //...
    }
}

But my concern is how do I ensure that if somebody writes another class class B extends Base it should also be a singleton and it necessarily implements a static method called getInstance?

In other words I need to enforce this as a specification for all classes extending with the Base class.

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Singlton and Base Class don't mix. –  Oded Sep 7 '12 at 13:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You cannot trust classes that extend you to create a single instance of themselves1: even if you could somehow ensure that they all implement getInstance, there is no way to tell that inside that method they check inst before constructing a new instance of themselves.

Stay in control of the process: create a Map<Class,Base>, and instantiate the class passed in through reflection2. Now your code can decide whether to create an instance or not, without relying on the getInstance of a subclass.


1 A popular saying goes, "If you want a job done right, do it yourself."

2 Here is a link describing a solution based on setAccessible(true)

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I think putting the instances in a map and making a lookup is what would work for me and it would also not require the child classes to be singletons. Thnks for the answer. –  mickeymoon Sep 7 '12 at 14:31

Singleton is a design pattern, not a language feature. It is pretty much impossible to somehow enforce it on the inheritance tree through syntax.

It certainly is possible to require all subclasses to implement a method by declaring it abstract but there is no way to control implementation details. Singleton is all about implementation details.

But why is this a concern at all? Do not make your app dependant on internal details of someone else's code. It is Bad Design™ and having this issue is a sure sign of it. Code against a well-defined interface and avoid relying on internal details.

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This is not about basing my code on someone else's rather I want to create a specification where any child class of base must necessarily implement a static method getInstance. I understand that we cannot enforce the implementation to be singleton specific but atleast the person extending base must be prompted by the compiler to implement getInstance so that it's not left out because it wasn't observered. But static methods cannot be put into specification as well. –  mickeymoon Sep 7 '12 at 14:25
    
Is there any reason why the person extending the base should not be responsible for observing the requirements? –  Saul Sep 7 '12 at 14:39
    
yes because this is a kind of api design consideration (whose clients might not be known to us) which by the way is well documented( that's why I dont bother getInstance's implementation because once person extending the class gets to see the enforcement, the documentation will tell him/her how to implement getInstance's code which could always be same ) but atleast the person must be dragged to look at the specifications. Anyhow a better solution came through in the post below so I've modified the design accordingly. –  mickeymoon Sep 7 '12 at 14:47
    
sorry not in the post below but in the post above –  mickeymoon Sep 7 '12 at 14:55
    
@mickeymoon - What dasblinkenlight suggests is pretty much not making your app dependant on internal details of someone else's code. But on the part of dragging another developer somewhere by implementing an obscure verification, I would say it is not a good idea. Let them have some responsibility, there is nothing wrong with that. –  Saul Sep 7 '12 at 16:00

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