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I am currently working with XML files, and am searching to have a better way to avoid try/catch blocks in a nice way.

Here is the thing. Let's say I have an XML file.

<A>
    <BB>37</BB>
    <CC>
        <DDD>1</DDD>
    </CC>
</A> 

In fact, I turn this into an object, which means that I can do myXml.getA() and so on.

In my code, I search a lot for given elements in this object, which means that I have a lot of lines like

int ddd = myXml.getA().getCC().getDDD();

The thing is that some elements may not be there, and for example another XML element can be like that only :

<A'>
    <BB'>37</BB'>
</A'> 

So if I try to get ddd, getCC() raises a NullPointerException.

In the end, I end up coding it like that :

int ddd;
try{
    ddd = myXml.getA().getCC().getDDD();
}
catch (NullPointerException e){
ddd = 0;
}

This works but the code becomes really ugly. I am searching for a solution to have something like

int ddd = setInt(myXml.getA().getCC().getDDD(), 0);

0 being the default in case the method raises an exception.

Is there a nice way to do that ?

Up to now, I couldn't find a solution that do not raise errors.

Thx for your help !

EDIT: Just not to get XML related answers. I showed the xml part for everybody to understand the problem. In my code, I don't have access to the XML, but only the object that represents it.

To make it short, what I'd really love is some kind of isNull method to test my getters.

share|improve this question
    
May be the Null objec pattern ? –  gontard Sep 7 '12 at 13:31
    
Seems interesting. Could I use this not for the xml itself, but for the value directly? I'm thinking about it –  jlengrand Sep 7 '12 at 13:38

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is sort of an annoyance of working with jaxb. in my company, we do enough work with jaxb that it was worth writing an xjc plugin which generated "safe" versions of every getter that were guaranteed to return non-null values for any non-trivial value (immutable instances in the case that a sub-object did not really exist).

Here's an example of what our generated model entities look like:

public class ExampleUser implements Serializable {
    private final static long serialVersionUID = 20090127L;
    @XmlAttribute
    protected String name;
    @XmlAttribute
    protected String email;
    public final static ExampleUser EMPTY_INSTANCE = new ExampleUser() {
        private static final long serialVersionUID = 0L;
        @Override
        public void setName(java.lang.String value) { throw new UnsupportedOperationException(); }
        @Override
        public void setEmail(java.lang.String value) { throw new UnsupportedOperationException(); }
    };

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    public void setName(String value) {
        this.name = value;
    }

    public String getEmail() {
        return email;
    }

    public void setEmail(String value) {
        this.email = value;
    }
}

public class ExampleAccount implements Serializable {
    private final static long serialVersionUID = 20090127L;
    protected ExampleUser user;
    @XmlElement(name = "alias")
    protected List<String> aliases;
    @XmlAttribute
    protected String id;
    @XmlAttribute
    protected String name;
    public final static ExampleAccount EMPTY_INSTANCE = new ExampleAccount() {
        private static final long serialVersionUID = 0L;
        @Override
        public void setUser(com.boomi.platform.api.ExampleUser value) { throw new UnsupportedOperationException(); }
        @Override
        public List<String> getAliases() { return java.util.Collections.emptyList(); }
        @Override
        public void setId(java.lang.String value) { throw new UnsupportedOperationException(); }
        @Override
        public void setName(java.lang.String value) { throw new UnsupportedOperationException(); }
    };

    public ExampleUser getUser() {
        return user;
    }

    public void setUser(ExampleUser value) {
        this.user = value;
    }

    public List<String> getAliases() {
        if (aliases == null) {
            aliases = new ArrayList<String>();
        }
        return this.aliases;
    }

    public String getId() {
        return id;
    }

    public void setId(String value) {
        this.id = value;
    }

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    public void setName(String value) {
        this.name = value;
    }

    public ExampleUser safeGetUser() {
        return (getUser() != null) ? getUser() : ExampleUser.EMPTY_INSTANCE;
    }
}

So you could write this code without fear of NPE:

userEmail = account.safeGetUser().getEmail();
share|improve this answer

You can look at the Null objec pattern.

For example :

public class A {
    private C c;
    public C getC() {
        if (c == null) {
            c = new C(0); // the "null object"
        }
        return c;
    }
}

public class C {
    private int d;
    public C(int d) {
        this.d = d;
    }

    public int getD() {
        return d;
    }
}

But personnaly, i have a bad feeling with this code :

int ddd = myXml.getA().getCC().getDDD();

It is a strong violation of the law of Demeter. The class invoker have a too large knowledge of A, C and D. This code will be clearly difficult to adapt and maintain.

share|improve this answer
    
It would mean that I need to have access to the XMLObject class defintion and modify it, wouldn't it ? –  jlengrand Sep 7 '12 at 13:54
    
@jlengrand yes. –  gontard Sep 7 '12 at 13:57
    
Hum, disappointing. This is exactly what I am trying to avoid :s –  jlengrand Sep 7 '12 at 13:58
    
It would also be a maintenance nightmare if the XML has any complexity at all, since you would have to create Null objects for every complex object you can do a get on from any level. Any changes in the XML also make for hellish refactoring. I would simply check for null over this option, especially since it also removes the ability to actually check if something is null without doing an instanceof. –  Robin Sep 7 '12 at 17:56
    
@Robin i agree this is not a perfect solution. But, the null check is centralized and return a default value. Checking for null everywhere in the code is also a maintenance nightmare. –  gontard Sep 8 '12 at 6:22

The two general approaches to this sort of problem are the null object pattern that other answers have already covered, and type safe nulls such as Scala's Option.

http://www.scala-lang.org/api/current/scala/Option.html

There are a few Java versions of Option knocking around.

http://functionaljava.googlecode.com/svn/artifacts/2.20/javadoc/fj/data/Option.html

http://docs.guava-libraries.googlecode.com/git/javadoc/com/google/common/base/Optional.html

Type safe nulls can be particular useful when combined with the flatmap.

share|improve this answer

Use Apache common-beanutils to create your set method. It will use reflection and then you have only a single place to catch the errors.

It would look something like this (haven't coded it so excuse syntax errors).

int getInt(Object root, String beanPattern, int defaultValue)
{
   try
   {
      return PropertyUtils.getNestedProperty(root, beanPattern);
   }
   catch (Exception e)
   {
      return 0;
   }
}

This would be called like so.

int ddd = getInt(myXml, "A.CC.DDD", 0);
share|improve this answer
    
+1 this is cool, never knew it exists. –  gigadot Sep 7 '12 at 14:34

Can't you just write a function which is general enough to be called for each value, and is returning the value or 0.

Something like

myGetSomething(FOO){
  try {getFOO} catch ...
}

Then your Code itself looks nice, but the function has basically a try-catch for each call.

share|improve this answer
    
Maybe you can even improve it with loops. depending how your XML is defined, it might be a really short Code. –  zen Sep 7 '12 at 13:34
    
I did try that. Problem is, my xml contains hundreds of differents elements. And if I try to put getFoo as input of the methods, the method is called and raise an Error before entering it. :s –  jlengrand Sep 7 '12 at 13:36

Use Xpath query instead of get methods. It will give you an empty list if it cannot find the element path.

List ddds = myXml.query("/AA/BB/CC/DDD");
if (!ddds.empty()) {}

The correct syntax depends on the XML library you use.

share|improve this answer
    
I edited my question. I do not have access to the XML, but only to an object with get methods, some that can return null. –  jlengrand Sep 7 '12 at 13:41
    
that is unfortunate :) –  gigadot Sep 7 '12 at 13:43
    
inded. Thx for the answer though –  jlengrand Sep 7 '12 at 13:44
    
are you going to have many of these calls? if so, i suggest you create something similar to xpath and use reflection to call the methods for you. otherwise, it's over kill. –  gigadot Sep 7 '12 at 13:54
    
read Robin's answer for what i suggested in the previous comment –  gigadot Sep 7 '12 at 14:35

Write part of the code in Groovy or Xtend; both support the ?. syntax which returns null of the left hand side of the expression evaluates to null. They also get rid of the useless get so you can write:

myXml.a?.cc?.ddd

The syntax of Xtend is worse when compared to Groovy but it compiles to plain Java, so you just need to add a single JAR with some helper classes to your code to use the result.

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