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I have a table that stores creation and closure dates. What I'm trying to do is run a query that gives me in a given time period, for each day, how many records were created, how many were closed, and how many were open. Table structure:

+------------------------+
| Field      | Structure |
+------------+-----------+
| id         | int       |
| start_date | datetime  |
| close_date | datetime  |
+------------+-----------+

The first two queries are not a problem - what I'm working with right now is this:

SELECT COUNT(*), start_date FROM dates 
WHERE start_date BETWEEN 'start' AND 'end' 
GROUP BY start_date 
ORDER BY start_date ASC

SELECT COUNT(*), close_date FROM dates 
WHERE close_date BETWEEN 'start' AND 'end' 
GROUP BY close_date 
ORDER BY close_date ASC

The third query is an issue - I can get it to give me how many were open on a day where that day exists in the table, but what I haven't figured out is how to make it write out a row for every day in the year and give me the count for that day.

That's the first problem.

The second is that I want to get it to give me a result like this, and I can't figure out how to do it - searching around here has given me a few false starts, but nothing solid.

+------------+--------+--------+--------+
|    Date    | Opened | Closed | Active |
+------------+--------+--------+--------+
| 2012-05-06 | 3      | 2      | 7      |
| 2012-05-07 | 2      | 0      | 9      |
| 2012-05-08 | 0      | 0      | 9      |
| 2012-05-09 | 0      | 3      | 6      |
+------------+--------+--------+--------+

I'm entirely willing to run separate queries if necessary and handle all of it in code instead of db if I have to - I'm fairly sure I can write all of the query data from the individual queries to a single array and just loop through that to build the report, but I'd really prefer not. Any suggestions?

share|improve this question
    
Where do you store whether the issue has been closed/active? The opened is when the record is created I presume. How about the other ones? - Never mind I just noticed the close_date. – Nikolaos Dimopoulos Sep 7 '12 at 14:09
up vote 0 down vote accepted

This query is tricky because you want the status list for every date in range.

In this query the dates are generated in join query. For that i used the same table assuming it has

  • count of records >= the number of dates between daterange
  • id-s must be consecutive up to number of dates between daterange

You can replace that with your own dates list generation subquery.

set @start :='2012-05-06';
set @end :='2012-05-09';

select cdate as Date
     , sum(start_date = cdate) Opened
     , sum(close_date = cdate or close_date is null) Closed
     , sum(start_date <= cdate and (close_date>cdate or close_date is null)) Active
from dates
join (select date(@start + interval id-1 day) cdate from dates where id <= to_days(@end)-to_days(@start)+1) d
  on start_date <= cdate and (close_date>=cdate or close_date is null)
where start_date <= @end 
  and (close_date >= @start or close_date is null)
group by cdate
order by cdate
;
share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately the second necessary condition isn't the case here. It's an inherent database where the record numbers jump around all over the place. I keep meaning to do a cleanup on them to fix that, but it's been a relatively low priority. That being said, that query is a very nice bit of code that I can use for a few other things I've been wanting to do. Thanks! – user1654836 Sep 10 '12 at 12:16

Creating an aggregate table like this is really difficult with just SQL statements. You will need to use subqueries, UNION statements and/or possibly a stored procedure to get the logic spot on so that it displays the table as you present it.

The two queries that you have already are much faster than the approach I mentioned above. A PHP array will definitely help there to get what you need.

So:

Step 1

SELECT COUNT(*) AS active_before_start 
WHERE start_date < 'start'
AND close_date IS NULL

Get that number and store it in $active_before_start.

Step 2

SELECT COUNT(*) AS total_opened, start_date FROM dates 
WHERE start_date BETWEEN 'start' AND 'end' 
GROUP BY start_date 
ORDER BY start_date ASC

Put these results in an array

foreach ($results as $result)
{
    $key = $result->start_date;
    $final_table[$key]['date']   = $key;
    $final_table[$key]['opened'] = $result->total_opened;
}

Step 3

SELECT COUNT(*) AS total_closed, close_date FROM dates 
WHERE close_date BETWEEN 'start' AND 'end' 
GROUP BY close_date 
ORDER BY close_date ASC

Again store those in the array

foreach ($results as $result)
{
    $key = $result->close_date;
    $final_table[$key]['date']   = $key;
    $final_table[$key]['closed'] = $result->total_closed;
}

Step 4

Now you can traverse the table to manipulate the data so that it produces the result you need as such:

$results_table = array();
$active        = $active_before_start;
foreach ($final_table as $key => $item)
{
    $opened = (isset($item['opened']) ? $item['opened'] : 0;
    $closed = (isset($item['closed']) ? $item['closed'] : 0;
    $active = $active + ($opened' - $closed);

    $results_table[$key]['date']   = $key;
    $results_table[$key]['opened'] = $opened;
    $results_table[$key]['closed'] = $closed;
    $results_table[$key]['active'] = $active;
}

From then on you can always do a ksort just in case to show the sorted array results.

HTH

share|improve this answer
2  
That helps some - got me at least most of the output I needed. Much appreciated :) I think what I'm actually going to do is just create a new table in the database that stores the active count based on opening/closure of projects per day - then just query that. That's going to be far simpler than getting a true active historic count. – user1654836 Sep 7 '12 at 18:03
    
Creating a new table that can be used for reporting purposes such as yours is definitely a great idea. One thing that you could also do is create a script that recalculates the data for that new table on a given date range. This way your data will always be accurate. – Nikolaos Dimopoulos Sep 7 '12 at 19:09
    
I found an old report someone had that let me fill in most of the historical counts. For the days going forward I created a table that stores a date and a count - when a record is created, it checks to see if the last date stored is equal to the current date. If it is, it increments the existing count. If the date isn't equal, it grabs the value from the most recent date, increments it by one, and inserts a new date record with the updated count. There's another check on the project closure procedure that does the same thing, only decrements the counter. Thanks for all of your help :) – user1654836 Sep 10 '12 at 12:19
    
Glad to hear that you resolved this. – Nikolaos Dimopoulos Sep 10 '12 at 16:24

I can get it to give me how many were open on a day where that day exists in the table, but what I haven't figured out is how to make it write out a row for every day in the year and give me the count for that day.

I understand it as : you want to count the issue for each close date?

SELECT COUNT(*) FROM dates WHERE your_condition GROUP BY DAY_OF_YEAR(close_date)
share|improve this answer
    
Not quite - I'm actually already doing that, effectively. What I'm trying to do is generate historical data - not how many were closed on each close date, or how many existed on each close date, but how many were open on each day of the year. – user1654836 Sep 7 '12 at 18:02
    
Ok, I understand a little bit more. I will come back tomorrow with an answer if nobody gives you. – artragis Sep 7 '12 at 20:33

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