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Javascript closure inside loops - simple practical example

I was trying to code something similar to this :

var funcs = [];
for (var i=0; i<5 ; ++i) {
    funcs[i]=function() {
        alert(i);
    };
}

Obviously, calling funcs[0] won't alert 0 as expected, simply because the variable i is captured by the anonymous function, and calling any of funcs[0..4] will alert '4' (the value of i after the last iteration and shared by all created functions).

The first work around that comes to my mind is using some kind of function generator :

var funcs = [];
for (var i=0; i<5 ; ++i) {
    funcs[i]=(function(cap) {
        return function() {alert(cap)};
    })(i);
}

This do the trick, but seems really puzzling and hard to read. Is there any better way to get the intended behavior without using a function wrapper?

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marked as duplicate by Raymond Chen, dystroy, Jon, Linus G Thiel, bmargulies Sep 7 '12 at 18:09

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Couldn't you use funcs[i].i = i; after the function statement? –  Waleed Khan Sep 7 '12 at 14:26
1  
Can't recreate (Chrome 21 / Mac 10.7) jsfiddle.net/VDm5C –  Waleed Khan Sep 7 '12 at 14:27
    
Nop, because in the real case that I'm working on, the scope is set on calling the function funcs[i].call(someObject, ..). This will override this, and this.i won't be accessible. –  sitifensys Sep 7 '12 at 14:29
    
JavaScript scope is at the function level. Thus when you create functions in another function, they share the parent function local variables. Opening a block (with { ... }) does not create a new scope, as it does in C++ or Java. –  Pointy Sep 7 '12 at 14:29
1  
@arxanas: Your example is slightly flawed. It works because when you are calling each of the functions, you are in a for loop, and changing the value of i to be the correct value. Change your 2nd for to use another var, and it won't work. jsfiddle.net/VDm5C/1 –  Rocket Hazmat Sep 7 '12 at 14:35

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The .bind function allows you to pre-bind additional parameters to a bound function:

var funcs = [];
for (var i=0; i<5 ; ++i) {
    funcs[i]=function(i) {
        alert(i);
    }.bind(this, i);
}

This is an ES5 function, so should work on IE9+, Chrome, Safari, Firefox:

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1  
IE is still not a real browser :p (just trolling) –  sitifensys Sep 7 '12 at 14:39

You should write it as simple as you can. I think it's easy to understand, but hard to read. So one way to simplify it is to use Nested coding style. I don't think it can't be simpler than as it is now.

I'd suggest this way:

var funcs = [];

for (var i = 0; i < 5; ++i) {
    funcs[i] = (
        function (cap) {
            return function () { alert(cap) };
        }
    )(i);
}
share|improve this answer

IMHO, named functions are often superior, for both performance and readability reasons. Why not do it like this:

function foo (cap) {
    return function () { alert(cap) };
}

var funcs = [];
for (var i=0; i<5 ; ++i) {
    funcs[i]=foo(i);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Because you need write a top-level function that is not used in any place else? –  Jon Sep 7 '12 at 14:32
2  
Jon: It doesn't have to be top-level, it just has to be in scope. –  Linus G Thiel Sep 7 '12 at 14:33
    
Sure, wrong expression on my part; pretend it's not there. It's still not ideal, it's really the same undesirable technique as e.g. creating classes to simulate closures in languages such as C++ and C#. Both of them have added lambdas specifically so that you don't have to write this kind of "machinery" code. –  Jon Sep 7 '12 at 14:35
    
Ideal is subjective. Apparently, @sitifensys thinks the anonymous closure is not ideal. Why are we arguing this? –  Linus G Thiel Sep 7 '12 at 14:39
    
We are not. I just answered your rhetorical question by voicing an opinion. –  Jon Sep 7 '12 at 14:41

Try this:

var funcs = [0, 1, 2, 3, 4].map(function(i) {
    return function() {alert(i);};
});

Note: map isn't suppoted by IE8 and older, but there's a common polyfill for it.

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I nearly wrote an answer like this, but then decided that [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, ...] doesn't scale... –  Alnitak Sep 7 '12 at 14:32
    
@Alnitak I know that feel, bro. I just wanted to show something different. This all belongs to some array generation algorithm. Maybe splitting strings, or creating Uint8Array, or whatever... –  MaxArt Sep 7 '12 at 14:34
    
ah, now that I can solve: Array.range = function f(m, n, z) { return m <=-- n ? (z = f(m, n), z.push(n), z) : [] }; –  Alnitak Sep 7 '12 at 14:35

When you don't want to embed your code with those anonymous functions, a solution is to define (named) class embedding both the state (i) and the function (in the prototype). That's more LOC but sometimes more readable :

var funcs = [];
function MyFunc(i) {
   this.i=i;
}
MyFunc.prototype.doIt = function(){
   alert(this.i);
};
for (var i=0; i<5 ; ++i) {
    funcs[i]=new MyFunc(i);
}

funcs[2].doIt();​
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