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I am trying to use the __thread specifier to create a thread local variable. This works OK in the following code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <pthread.h>

static __thread int val;

int main()
{
  val = 10;
}

But if I try to use the __thread specifier in a class as follows:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <pthread.h>

class A
{
public:
  A();
  static __thread int val;
};

A::A()
{
  val = 10;
}

int main()
{
  A a;
}

I get the compiler error: undefined reference to 'A::val'

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That is not a compiler error. It's a linker error. –  Kerrek SB Sep 7 '12 at 15:16
    
possible duplicate of C++: undefined reference to static class member –  jogojapan Oct 30 '12 at 13:04

2 Answers 2

You've only declared the static variable; you must also define it outside the class (in just one source file, if you have multiple source files):

int __thread A::val;
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__thread in GCC is the same as thread_local in C++. –  Kerrek SB Sep 7 '12 at 15:17
    
@KerrekSB: Which I'm also not familiar with :). But now I've managed to fire up the compiler, and confirm that you do need it in the definition. –  Mike Seymour Sep 7 '12 at 15:20
1  
@KerrekSB: Unfortunately, it is not, since __thread does not know about ctors and dtors. –  PlasmaHH Sep 7 '12 at 15:26
    
@PlasmaHH: Are you sure, even in g++ with -std=c++11? Interesting. But I think it plays the same grammatical role. –  Kerrek SB Sep 7 '12 at 15:27
    
@KerrekSB: Yes I am (at least for gcc 4.7, don't know if there are any plans to change it). Note that in C++11 thread_local is a storage class specifier on its own, while the gcc extension is just a "special static". So "__thread static" is similar to "thread_local". –  PlasmaHH Sep 10 '12 at 9:40

Static variables have to defined outside the class declaration scope. Like this:

int A::val;
share|improve this answer
    
non-integral static variables have to be initialized outside the class declaration, but any type can be declared within the class. –  ssube Sep 7 '12 at 19:28

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