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Are there reasons why you would want to do this:

void foo() throws Exception
{
    // Do something potentially exceptional
}

Rather than throwing an existing or custom exception?

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closed as not constructive by Michael Easter, tereško, Clyde Lobo, Andrew, FelipeAls Sep 7 '12 at 21:24

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1  
Test methods often include that declaration. –  Јοеу Sep 7 '12 at 17:09
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10 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

There's two cases I can potentially think of - the first similar case I can think of is when implementing finalize(), you have to throw Throwable:

@Override
protected void finalize() throws Throwable {
    super.finalize();
}

...though bear in mind some argue that using finalize should be discouraged in itself.

The potential second case is when using a (badly written) library whose method(s) may throw an Exception, in which case if you don't want to deal with it in that particular method your only option is to throw it up the stack.

Personally though, if that were me I'd most likely wrap it up in a RuntimeException then and there:

public void doSomething() {
    try {
        int x = libraryThing.badMethod(); //Library method that throws "Exception"
    }
    catch(Exception ex) {
        throw new RuntimeException("Couldn't do something", ex);
    }
}

The second argument to RuntimeException's constructor is important in this case though, since if it is thrown that will preserve the original exception on the stack trace as ("Caused by: x"). Of course, if you can find a more specific subclass of RuntimeException that you can guarantee is relevant in that context (IllegalArgumentException for instance) then using that would be better.

In terms of normal code however, nope - I'd argue it's nearly always an anti-pattern (and usually one just caused through laziness!)

As a side point, throwing a RuntimeException isn't so bad - it's still very unspecific but at least doesn't force the caller to catch everything explicitly.

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Wrapping everything into RuntimeException can make it harder to debug and also harder to handle the exception. Also it obscures the fact that a method may fail because the caller no longer has a clear indication an exception may be thrown. –  Durandal Sep 7 '12 at 16:05
    
@Durandal It very much depends on the context - of course doing that as a blanket rule for all exceptions is a very bad thing, and sometimes the exception should be propagated up the stack. The point of this is that you'd do it when you don't want to handle the exception elsewhere (and as for debugging, that's the very reason you pass the original exception as a causal parameter into the RuntimeException.) Having said that, the best solution I find though is just trying not to use such libraries that perform such actions in the first place. –  berry120 Sep 7 '12 at 17:49
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I wouldn't do it. It provides the minimum of information about what happened.

I think the current best practice would be to prefer unchecked exceptions (this is the C# way). The foo() method would catch checked exceptions and wrap them in a RuntimeException.

I'd either spell out the exceptions, wrap them in a more business specific custom exception, or wrap a RuntimeException.

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It allows the method to throw arbitrary exceptions.

This may be found in framework contexts, where arbitrary code runs in methods with known signatures. Whether it's "good" in that context... meh. I'd rather see a framework-specific or runtime exceptions.

Other than that, it's generally an anti-pattern, IMO.

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I often do this in my test methods.

@Test
public void testSOmething() throws Exception {

This is my standard signature for unit tests that are not specifically testing to see if an exception is thrown (which is most tests.)

Outside of those tests, I don't care what exception my tests might throw, because throwing an exception in those cases represents a failure of the method under test.

I never do this in production code, though.

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You don't write tests to show how an exception might be thrown (e.g. what happens if a required element is missing)? I do. I use the @Expected annotation in that case. –  duffymo Sep 7 '12 at 15:42
    
I do the same thing in my unit test methods too. In a test, clarity of code is important, and nested try/catch blocks can get in the way of that. Also, catching the exception and throwing a new RuntimeException or logging it makes it harder to track down the source of the problem in an IDE because the original call stack is either obscured or not even available. –  Ed Griebel Sep 7 '12 at 15:45
    
@duffymo I think the answerer was talking about when an unexpected exception was raised, such as during a database or IO operation, that is essentially unrecoverable in a testing situation. –  Ed Griebel Sep 7 '12 at 15:47
    
Thanks for clarifying, Ed. I never nest try/catch: one to a customer. Sounds like we agree on how to do this. –  duffymo Sep 7 '12 at 15:53
    
If you're unit testing a method that declares that it can throw a checked exception, you have to either try-catch the statement (not a good idea for a test, since readability is paramount) or declare your test method to throw the exception. It's irrelevant whether an exception is actually thrown at runtime. –  Mark Peters Sep 7 '12 at 17:03
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You might declare throws Exception if the actual list is very long and not interesting. e.g. when invoking methods via reflections this can result in quite a few Exceptions.

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You may be implementing Java's own Callable interface! That about sums it up. If you are providing some superstructure in which someone else's code may run, but you don't want to constrain them to being forced to catch any and all checked exceptions inside. One could assert that this is not bad design of your own library per-se, but a hazard of the bad design of Checked Exceptions in the first place (but then we'd be having a Holy War, not an SO question.)

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in general, it means either bad design of the code, or bad design of underlying libraries. If you find yourself declaring "throws Exception" for no good reason - consider throwing RuntimeException instead. Especially in library code.

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Or (even better in library code) try to find a more specific RuntimeException to throw - IllegalArgumentException or InvalidStateException for instance. –  berry120 Sep 7 '12 at 17:50
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Generally I find "throws Exception" acceptable for methods declared in an interface that is to be implemented by someone else and can have very different implementations (you wouldn't want to constrict the possible implementations in what they may throw).

I find it also acceptable when there are a great many exceptions to be thrown from a method.

I wouldn't consider it an anti-pattern, but an idiom often used out of lazyness.

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Based on buisness rules define your own exception

public void doSomething() {
    try {
        int x = 10/0; //Library method that throws "Exception"
    }
    catch(Exception ex) {
        throw new Exception("this doesn;t work.there is exception", ex);
    }
}

This overrides Exception method;

class Exception
{
   Exception()
   {
   }

   Exception(String msg)
   {
      this.msg=msg;      
   }
}
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Only you should name it "MyGenericException" or some such. –  Hot Licks Sep 7 '12 at 16:53
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It's often done in test/quick-and-dirty code, and that's very reasonable.

It's sometimes done when the throws list is long and tedious -- semi-reasonable

And some developers/projects do this for everything since they have a different philosophy about "checked" exceptions, which is OK (I'm of two minds on this topic myself) if they aren't intending to have significant code sharing with "the rest of the world".

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