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I have a WPF application that on load executes a method that checks if certain files exist, and if not, downloads them. It also downloads a string to be used as a message, and outputs to an in-app console.

However, when I launch the program I see a white screen for a few seconds, then the window loads and everything is done. So it appears that the method is being executed before the window loads.

How can I wait for the window to load, wait about 2 seconds, then run the method?

This is the code of the method i am trying to run:

consolemessage("STARTUP", "Verifying existence of essential files...");
if(!File.Exists("Interop.NATUPNPLib.dll"))
    Download("link here", "Interop.NATUPNPLib.dll");
if(!File.Exists("LICENSE.txt"))
    Download("link here", "LICENSE.txt");
consolemessage("STARTUP", "Essential file validation completed!");
share|improve this question
    
An advise, never use hardcoded time intervals for multithreading. Run the code on a different machine and it all might break. I would try to Dispatch the loading in the Loaded event of the window, with a priority of Background. –  dowhilefor Sep 7 '12 at 15:36

3 Answers 3

If you see a white screen for a few seconds, it means your task (downloading the files) is taking a few seconds. You could start this task after your window loads by subscribing to the "Loaded" event of your window, but it's still going to freeze the application for 3 seconds.

You have to a create a solution that fits your needs for how to handle this task in a user friendly way.

If you want to block the user from using the application before this information is retrieved, you can create a popup with a loading animation or a progress bar. You can animate these as your task is given time to complete.

If you want the user to be able to use your application while the information is loaded in the background, you need to use something like a BackgroundWorker or other asynchronous design to load the information on another thread, then callback the main thread when the information is ready and loaded. If you're using web requests, you can often just turn them into asynchronous web requests by using the asynchronous overloads such as "BeginGetResponse". It depends on your code.

EDIT:

You could create the BackgroundWorker in the scope of your Window like so:

public partial class MainWindow : Window
{
    private BackgroundWorker worker;

    public MainWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponent();

        Loaded += MainWindow_Loaded;
    }

    void MainWindow_Loaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        worker = new BackgroundWorker();
        worker.DoWork += worker_DoWork;
        worker.RunWorkerCompleted += worker_RunWorkerCompleted;
        worker.RunWorkerAsync();
        consolemessage("STARTUP", "Verifying existence of essential files...");
    }

    void worker_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
    {
        if (!File.Exists("Interop.NATUPNPLib.dll"))
            Download("link here", "Interop.NATUPNPLib.dll");

        if (!File.Exists("LICENSE.txt"))
            Download("link here", "LICENSE.txt");
    }

    void worker_RunWorkerCompleted(object sender, RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e)
    {
        // Signal your UI that the files are now available here if needed.
        consolemessage("STARTUP", "Essential file validation completed!");
    }
}
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Thanks, but ive barely done much threading before - how would the bgworker be done? –  user1588364 Sep 7 '12 at 16:00
    
Added an example. –  Trevor Elliott Sep 7 '12 at 16:12
    
Thanks, for some reason it runs the method 3 times, what am i doing wrong? –  user1588364 Sep 7 '12 at 18:11
    
It shouldn't. Are you creating multiple instances of the object you put it in? For example, did you put the code into a UserControl and then creating that UserControl 3 times in your window? –  Trevor Elliott Sep 7 '12 at 18:49
    
I fixed it now, thanks anyway. I didn't need this: Loaded += MainWindow_Loaded; –  user1588364 Sep 7 '12 at 19:50

You could place the code in the Window_Loaded event. Here is a quick and dirty implementation that won't freeze your UI (just keep in mind if the user can do something that attempts to reference these things before they are actually complete it could throw an exception, in which case use Moozhe's solution to create a loading screen of some kind)

Using at top:

using System.Threading;

simple code:

private void Window_Loaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    Thread t = new Thread( YourMethod);
    t.IsBackground = true;
    t.Start();
}
void YourMethod()
{
    consolemessage("STARTUP", "Verifying existence of essential files...");
    if (!File.Exists("Interop.NATUPNPLib.dll"))
        Download("link here", "Interop.NATUPNPLib.dll");
    if (!File.Exists("LICENSE.txt"))
        Download("link here", "LICENSE.txt");
    consolemessage("STARTUP", "Essential file validation completed!");
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thats what it is in. –  user1588364 Sep 7 '12 at 15:49
    
@user1588364 are you running the process on the same thread? Maybe post a little bit of your code that is causing the issue. Also are you sure you are in window_loaded and not the constructor? –  Kevin DiTraglia Sep 7 '12 at 15:51
    
Im in the Window_Loaded. But its running on the same thread. Ill add my code to the question. –  user1588364 Sep 7 '12 at 15:54
    
@user1588364 OK, sounds like you could just put the long running logic into another thread and it will fix your problem, no need to wait. –  Kevin DiTraglia Sep 7 '12 at 15:56
    
Added the code of the method. –  user1588364 Sep 7 '12 at 15:57

You could also initiate a one shot timer in your Form.Loaded Event with a 100 millisecond delay or so, then run your method in it. That is what I have done in the past to allow the Form to fully load before I run my Code.

example:

public partial class MainWindow : Window
{
    System.Windows.Threading.DispatcherTimer oneShot = new System.Windows.Threading.DispatcherTimer();
    public MainWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        oneShot.Interval = new TimeSpan(0, 0, 0, 0, 100);
        oneShot.Tick += new EventHandler(oneShot_Tick);
    }

    void oneShot_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        oneShot.Stop();

        // Your Code or Method here
    }

    private void Window_Loaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        oneShot.Start();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
How is this done? –  user1588364 Sep 7 '12 at 16:09
    
@user1588364 See my edit. –  Mark Hall Sep 7 '12 at 16:14
    
Thanks, this will come in useful in the future! –  user1588364 Sep 7 '12 at 17:36

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