Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm new with vectors and I am trying to display a vector in a square like you can display a array in a square. Is that possible or do you have to display more than one vector as follows:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    vector<int>v(3);
    vector<int>w(3);
    vector<int>x(3);
    for(int i = 0; i < 2; i++)
    {
        v[i] = i;
        w[i] = i;
        x[i] = i;
        cout << v[i] << " " << w[i] << " " << x[i] << endl;

    }
    return 0;
} 

Display:

0 0 0 
1 1 1 
2 2 2 

How do i display one vector in a square? Remember the display is important at this stage and not the values of the vector!!

share|improve this question
2  
You want a 2D vector? –  Doug T. Sep 7 '12 at 15:34
1  
Since you're counting 1 to 3, inclusive, you would be out of bounds when i == 3 –  noisecapella Sep 7 '12 at 15:34
1  
Yes i want a 2D vector. –  Johan Dela Sep 7 '12 at 15:35
    
Have you tried it? –  Dani Sep 7 '12 at 15:35
    
Yes and it displayed in a square. –  Johan Dela Sep 7 '12 at 15:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

No, you're code is not correct. Vectors, like all arrays in C++, are 0-indexed; thus the valid indexes go from 0 to size() - 1. Your code uses index size(), and thus has undefined behaviour.

Unlike you insist, the values are rather important when you use them as indexes to your vectors. If you simply want to display numbers, you don't necessarily need any vectors at all (and you can choose your ranges at will):

for (int i = 1; i <= 3; ++i)
    std::cout << i << ' ' << i << ' ' << i << '\n';

And no, you don't need several vectors to display "a square of values". If you want to output the contents of a single vector to multiple lines, all you got to do is decide how many elements you want to have on a single line, and simply output a newline character after every this many elements, i.e.

std::vector<int> vec = { 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 2, 4, 6, 8 };
int elements_on_this_line = 0,
    elements_to_output_per_line = 3;
for (int i: vec) {
    std::cout << i;
    elements_on_this_line++;
    if (elements_on_this_line == elements_to_output_per_line) {
        std::cout << '\n';
        elements_on_this_line = 0;
    } else {
        std::cout << ' ';
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I am starting at 1 and not at 0 on my for loop. for(int i = 1; i <= 3;i++) and that is the same as for(int i = 0; i < 2; i++) –  Johan Dela Sep 7 '12 at 15:37
6  
@JohanDela no it isn't. –  Rapptz Sep 7 '12 at 15:37
    
It is more convenient in the fact that i can start numbering from 1 and dont have to start at 0. –  Johan Dela Sep 7 '12 at 15:38
    
Only the display changes –  Johan Dela Sep 7 '12 at 15:38
    
The values are not important at this stage. –  Johan Dela Sep 7 '12 at 15:39

I am trying to display a vector in a square like you can display a array in a square. Is that possible

Sure, why not?

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

int main()
{
    std::vector<int> vec { 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 2, 4, 6, 8};
    auto it = vec.begin();
    for (int y = 0; y < 3; ++y)
    {
        for (int x = 0; x < 3; ++x)
        {
            std::cout << *it++ << ' ';
        }
        std::cout << '\n';
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I fixed and the code to do the following:

#include <iostream>

#include <vector>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
  vector<vector<int> > v;
  int k = 0;
  for ( int i = 0; i < 5; i++ ) {
    v.push_back ( vector<int>() );
    for ( int j = 0; j < 5; j++ )
    v[i].push_back ( k++ );
}
for ( int i = 0; i < 5; i++ ) 
{
  for ( int j = 0; j < 5; j++ )
    cout<<v[i][j] <<' ';
    cout<<'\n';
}
}

thanks for the help.

share|improve this answer

Since the values are the same you could just do:

int main() {
    std::vector<int>v = {1,2,3};
    for(auto& i : v)
        std::cout << i << " " << i << " " << i << std::endl;
} 
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.