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Had a class:

 class filedate
 {
      public int id;
      public string fname;
 }

Fill my list with values:

 List<filedate> List = ReadList(sqlFiles);
 string[] FolderFiles = System.IO.Directory.GetFiles(path2Copy);

Trying to get results:

  var results = List.Where(filedate =>
        FolderFiles.Any(x=>Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(x) ==             
        Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(filedate.fname)));

I have the same files in List and FolderFiles, but get no results in results. I am a newbie to Linq. Where is the problem?

update: List: (count) > 1000 for example: <1023, 'tr_F2opervag_2808_1644.dat'>

FolderFiles example: "\\domain.corp.dns\share\folder\tr_F2opervag_2808_1644.dat"

Update 2: found out my mistake! Comment with intersection was helpful! This code is working:

  var results = List.Where(
            (filedate x) =>
            {
                return ! FolderFiles.Any(xxx =>
                Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(xxx) ==
                Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(x.fname));
            });
share|improve this question
    
Have you heard of System.IO.FileInfo? docs –  ChaosPandion Sep 7 '12 at 15:54
    
Your code seems correct, would you show sample input? –  Saeed Amiri Sep 7 '12 at 15:56
1  
What do you do with results? Do you loop over it? Do you store it in a list or array? –  ChaosPandion Sep 7 '12 at 15:57
1  
Probably the problem is in the string comparison. Do the file names have the same case, for example? Use the debugger. –  phoog Sep 7 '12 at 15:57
1  
Your IDE is punishing you for using uppercase on the first letter of your declared variable names. :P –  JHubbard80 Sep 7 '12 at 16:16
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You're code works fine for me so there's something wrong with the format of your data in the List coming back from the database.

Post an example of an fname value from the filedata object. It needs to be a valid fully qualified path.

This works fine for me.

public class FileData{
    public int id;
    public string fname;
}
void Main()
{
    List<FileData> list = new List<FileData>{
        new FileData { id=1, fname="C:\\install.res.1042.dll"},
        new FileData { id=2, fname="C:\\install.res.1041.dll" },
        new FileData { id=3, fname="C:\\install.res.9999.dll"}
    };

    string[] FolderFiles = System.IO.Directory.GetFiles("C:\\");

    var results = list
        .Where(fd => 
            FolderFiles.Any(x=>Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(x) ==             
            Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(fd.fname)));

    Console.WriteLine(results);
}
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If you need to find the difference this should work. This is available via Enumerable.Except.

var dbFiles = ReadList(sqlFiles);

var dbFilePaths =
    dbFiles.Select(fdate => 
       Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(fdate.fname).ToLower());

var fsFilePaths =
    Directory
    .GetFiles(path2Copy)
    .Select(filePath => 
        Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(filePath).ToLower());

var diff = 
    dbFilePaths
    .Except(fsFilePaths)
    .Join(dbFiles, 
       filePath => filePath, 
       fdate => fdate.fname, 
      (filePath, fdate) => fdate)
    .ToList();
share|improve this answer
    
returns a IEnumerable<string> ... not an IEnumerable<FileData> which is what I think he wants. Otherwise the intersect would have worked fine. –  Eoin Campbell Sep 7 '12 at 16:21
    
@EoinCampbell - Better? –  ChaosPandion Sep 7 '12 at 16:29
    
yep spot on :-) –  Eoin Campbell Sep 7 '12 at 16:30
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