Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'd like to have a library class that maintains state across the same request. My use case is that I want to pass 'messages' to the class, and then call them at any time from a view. Messages can be added from any part of the application.

I had originally done this via static methods, which worked fine. However, as part of the lib, I also need to call __construct and __destruct(), which can't be done on a static class.

Here's a very simple example of what I am trying to do:

class Messages
{
  private static $messages = array();

  public function __construct()
  {
    // do something
  }

  public function __destruct()
  {
    // do something else
  }

  public static function add($message)
  {
    self::$messages[] = $message;
  }
  public static function get()
  {
    return self::$messages;
  }
}

I can then add messages anywhere in my code by doing

Messages::add('a new message');

I'd like to avoid using static if at all possible (testability). I have looked at DI, but it doesn't seem appropriate, unless I'm missing something.

I could create a class (non-static) instead, but how do I then ensure that all messages are written to the same object - so that I can retrieve them all later?

What's the best way to tackle this?

share|improve this question
    
you could serialize the class and save it in a database or file –  hackattack Sep 7 '12 at 16:36
    
Why you don't use a message queue? –  Yago Riveiro Sep 7 '12 at 16:41

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I looks like you could benefit from using the Singleton pattern - it is designed for an object that must have only one instance throughout a request. Basically, you create a private constructor and a static method to retrieve the sole instance. Here is an example of a singleton that will do what you describe.

<?php
class Messages
{
    private static $_instance;
    private $_messages = array();

    private function __construct() {
        // Initialize
    }

    static public function instance() {
        if (! self::$_instance) {
            self::$_instance = new self();
        }
        return self::$_instance;
    }

    public function add_message( $msg ) {
        $this->_messages[] = $message;
    }

    public function get_messages() {
        return $this->_messages;
    }

    private function __destruct() {
        // Tear-down
    }
}

$my_messages = Messages::instance();
$my_messages->add_message( 'How now, brown cow?' );
// ...
$your_messages = Messages::instance();
$msgs = $your_messages->get_messages();
echo $your_messages[0]; // Prints, "How now, brown cow?"

Since the constructor is private, you can only create a Messages object from within a method of the object itself. Since you have a static method, instance(), you can create a new Messages instance from there. However, if an instance already exists, you want to return that instance.

Basically, a singleton is the gatekeeper to its own instance, and it stubbornly refuses to ever let more than one instance of itself exist.

share|improve this answer

Sounds like you are wanting to do a Singleton class. This will create an instance in one class and allow you to access that same instance in another class. Check out http://www.developertutorials.com/tutorials/php/php-singleton-design-pattern-050729-1050/ for more information.

share|improve this answer

How about making it a singleton class?

class Messages
{
    // singleton instance of Messages
    private static $instance;

    public function __construct() { ... }

    public static function getInstance()
    {
        if (!self::$instance)
        {
            self::$instance = new Messages();
        }

        return self::$instance;
    }
}

This would ensure that all your messages get written to the same object, and also allow you to call __construct and __destruct

share|improve this answer

What you need is the Singleton pattern:

final class Singleton {
    // static variable to store the instance
    private static $instance = NULL;

    // disable normal class constructing
    private function __construct() {}

    // instead of using the normal way to construct the class you'll use this method
    public static function getInstance() {
       if (NULL === self::$instance) {
           self::$instance = new self;
       }
       return self::$instance;
    }
    // disable external cloning of the object
    private function __clone() {}
}

// get the instance across some of your scripts
$singleton = Singleton::getInstance();
share|improve this answer

Sounds a bit like you want a singleton, although as an anti-pattern I'd avoid it.

You could do a full static class where every static member calls a self::_isBuilt(); method to do your construct elements. Destruct is a little trickier.

The best case for your needs might be a normal (non-static) class that you build right away and then access from a global... not super neat, but allows construct/destruct and members, and your statics to use $this which could be helpful. If you don't like the global variable, you could also wrap it in a method (a trick used in JS a fair bit) but it's not really any neater.

As a normal global class:

$myClass=new myClass();
//Access anywhere as:
globals['myClass']->myFunction(..);

Wrapped in a function

function my_class() {
 static $var=null;
 if ($var===null) $var=new myClass();
 return $var;
}
//Access anywhere as:
my_class()->myFunction(..);
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.