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I found two bugs in a program that created a lot of duplicate values:

  • an 'index' was created instead of a 'unique index'
  • a duplication checks wasn't integrated in one of 4 twisted routines

So I need to go in and clean up my database.

Step one is to decorate the table with a count of all the duplicate values (next I'll look into finding the first value, and then migrating everything over )

The code below works, I just recall doing a similar "update from select count" on the same table years ago, and I did it in half as much code.

Is there a better way to write this?

UPDATE 
    shared_link 
SET 
    is_duplicate_of_count = subquery.is_duplicate_of_count 
FROM
    (
        SELECT 
            count(url) AS is_duplicate_of_count 
            , url
        FROM 
            shared_link
        WHERE
            shared_link.url = url
        GROUP BY 
            url
    ) AS subquery
WHERE 
    shared_link.url = subquery.url
;
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You query is fine, generally, except for the pointless (but also harmless) WHERE clause in the subquery:

UPDATE shared_link 
SET    is_duplicate_of_count = subquery.is_duplicate_of_count 
FROM  (
    SELECT url
         , count(url) AS is_duplicate_of_count 
    FROM   shared_link
--  WHERE  shared_link.url = url
    GROUP  BY url
    ) AS subquery
WHERE shared_link.url = subquery.url;

The commented clause is the same as

WHERE  shared_link.url = shared_link.url

and therefore only eliminating NULL values (because NULL = NULL is not TRUE), which is most probably neither intended nor needed in your setup.


Other than that you can only shorten your code further with aliases and shorter names:

UPDATE shared_link s
SET    ct = u.ct
FROM  (
    SELECT url, count(url) AS ct
    FROM   shared_link
    GROUP  BY 1
    ) AS u
WHERE s.url = u.url;

In PostgreSQL 9.1 or later you might be able to do the whole operation (identify dupes, consolidate data, remove dupes) in one SQL statement with aggregate and window functions and data-modifying CTEs - thereby eliminating the need for an additional column to begin with.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks so much, Erwin! I'm still on the 8.4.x branch on this machine. –  Jonathan Vanasco Sep 7 '12 at 19:11

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