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I have already asked a question about syntax highlighting, but this seems (to me) to be different and I could not find the answer in Stackoverflow.

1) Suppose I want to build a Todo list in Vim. This Todo list should have the task + 3 differently highlighted "regions" :

  • the task (e.g. wash the car), always at the beginning, should remain plain non-highlighted text
  • the person who has to do that thing - myself - preceded by @. I want it to be highlighted in (e.g.) green
  • the category of the task - here Household - preceded by §. I want it to be in yellow
  • the importance of the task - here Later -, preceded by # which I want to be red.

Thus the result should be (in one line) :

Wash the car @myself (green) §Household (yellow) #Later (red)

I have tried to define a first region starting with @, ending with §, a second starting with § and ending with #, and a third starting with # and ending with $.

:syntax region xPers start ='@' end='§'
hi xPers ctermfg=DarkGreen
:syntax region xProject start ='§' end='#'
hi xProject ctermfg=DarkYellow
:syntax region xImportance start ='#' end='$'
hi xImportance ctermfg=DarkRed

To no avail… All the indications that comes after the task itself, starting with @ are highlighted in green.

What are my (unforgivable) errors ?

2) To make things more complicated, I might write tasks down in a disorderly way, and write :

Wash the car @myself (green) #Later (red) §Household (yellow)

How should the syntax be defined to take this lack of discipline in consideration, and keep the colors right ?

Thanks in advance

share|improve this question
    
I won't lie, I know nothing about this, but I would start with some general debugging techniques: What happens if you switch the colors? (ie are the colors you provided all valid) What happens if you switch the order of the regions? (Ie are the 'end' markers working properly) What happens if you switch the symbols? (is that ridiculous character causing any issues?) –  im so confused Sep 7 '12 at 17:25
    
I did all this : the first symbol (@, # or §) defines the color. By the way, § means paragraph ... –  ThG Sep 7 '12 at 17:31
    
ahh, good to know haha thanks! Well, if you let me know where I should be putting this code (complete linux/unix newbie), I have a RHEL putty session up and can play around with it for a few min to see –  im so confused Sep 7 '12 at 17:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You might want to take a look at Todo.txt and the vim syntax file for Todo.txt. However, as per your question, it seems like you want to end with a space instead of a symbol. So you could do this:

syntax region xPers start ='@' end=' '
hi xPers ctermfg=DarkGreen
syntax region xProject start ='§' end=' '
hi xProject ctermfg=DarkYellow
syntax region xImportance start ='#' end=' '
hi xImportance ctermfg=DarkRed

however this won't account for the end of a line. So you could put an "or" statement in there for the end of the line like this:

syntax region xPers start ='@' end=' \|$'
hi xPers ctermfg=DarkGreen
syntax region xProject start ='§' end=' \|$'
hi xProject ctermfg=DarkYellow
syntax region xImportance start ='#' end=' \|$'
hi xImportance ctermfg=DarkRed
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, it works perfectly. I looked at Todo.txt's syntax file, but it seems - at first glance - a bit overkill for my needs (and my level in Vim). I shall a closer look later, anyway. Thanks again. –  ThG Sep 8 '12 at 5:45

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