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I have recently learned about Unix inodes and their purpose. In particular, I learned that an.inode is unique across a filesystem.

My question is: if a user inserts a Micro SD card into their Android device, does that card become part of the existing filesystem or does it become a separate filesystem?

or, to put it another way: can inodes be duplicated across the internal and external storages?

Many thanks, P

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Note that Micro SD cards usually use FAT32, a file system which store no inodes. The Linux kernel is faking temporary inodes when accessing FAT32. –  jlliagre Sep 7 '12 at 18:11
    
I see. What do you mean by "faking temporary inodes"? Is there a way to uniquely identify files on Fat32 in a similar way to inodes? –  protectedmember Sep 7 '12 at 18:53
    
Their pathname is enough to uniquely identify them, unlike with other file systems where a file can have any number of pathnames including none at all. By faking temporary inodes, I mean the file system driver is creating a random inode number that is different from other ones when a new file is accessed. These numbers are dropped when the file system is unmounted (or perhaps sooner). When the file system is accessed again, new numbers are picked. –  jlliagre Sep 7 '12 at 20:28
    
I need numerical identifiers which is why I asked about inodes. Now it appears my next question is "exactly when are the fake inodes dropped?" –  protectedmember Sep 7 '12 at 23:12
    
See my reply for an answer and suggestion. –  jlliagre Sep 8 '12 at 7:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Micro SD cards usually use FAT32, a file system which store no inodes. The Linux kernel is creating a random inode number that is different from other ones when a new file is accessed.

On a FAT32 file system, a pathname is enough to uniquely identify a file, unlike with other file systems where a file can have any number of pathnames including none at all.

These FAT32 fake inode numbers are dropped:

  • when the file system is unmounted
  • when the OS reboots
  • when the fixed size cache where they are stored is full

Should you want a reliable way to identify files on FAT32, don't use their inodes.

I would suggest to use a hash of their pathname, combined with their size if you want to be really sure to avoid collision.

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Perfect, thank you very much! –  protectedmember Sep 8 '12 at 8:30

It's a separate filesystem. So yes, a file on the internal storage can have the same inode number as a file on the external storage, even though they are distinct files.

In case your real question is how to uniquely identify a file, you need both the inode number and the device id number. Both can be retrieved with the *stat() family syscalls, specifically the st_dev and st_ino fields of the stat struct.

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But as noted in jlliagre's comment, external storage is typically FAT32, which doesn't have real inode numbers -- they may change from mount to mount, and maybe even when dcache is flushed (I'm not sure). Also note that Android now "fakes" /sdcard on devices without removable storage with a FUSE filesystem, so even though the underlying storage is the same ext4 as /, it acts more like FAT32. –  ephemient Sep 7 '12 at 18:37
    
I was under the impression that the inode number alone is enough to uniquely identify a file in a filesystem? Why would I also need the device id? –  protectedmember Sep 7 '12 at 18:56
    
@protectedmember: The device id is precisely there to sort out files with the same inode number but stored on different file systems, which are identified by their device ids. –  jlliagre Sep 7 '12 at 20:38
    
So, the device id is the id of the storage media and not the Android device itself and the internal and external storages will have their own ids? –  protectedmember Sep 7 '12 at 22:26
    
@protectedmember: Yes. For more info see e.g. pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/basedefs/… –  janneb Sep 8 '12 at 7:03

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