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I have a program whihch needs to store several numbers. The largest one can be of the order 10^15. How should I go about storing the number.

I'm using Gcc 4.3.2 compiler.

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3  
What kind of numbers – integers, approximate reals, exact fractions...? –  leftaroundabout Sep 7 '12 at 17:47
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1 Answer

long long would fit 10^15 as it is 64 bits.

To see the limit values of all the data types you could use the <limits> header.

#include <iostream>
#include <limits>    

int main() {
    //print maximum of various types
    std::cout << "Maximum values :\n";
    std::cout << "Short : " << std::numeric_limits<short>::max() << std::endl;
    std::cout << "Int : " << std::numeric_limits<int>::max() << std::endl;
    std::cout << "Long : " << std::numeric_limits<long>::max() << std::endl;
    std::cout << "Long Long: " << std::numeric_limits<long long>::max() << std::endl;
    std::cout << "Float : " << std::numeric_limits<float>::max() << std::endl;
    std::cout << "Double : " << std::numeric_limits<double>::max() << std::endl;

    //print minimum of various types
    std::cout << "\n";
    std::cout << "Minimum Values: \n";
    std::cout << "Short : " << std::numeric_limits<short>::min() << std::endl;
    std::cout << "Int : " << std::numeric_limits<int>::min() << std::endl;
    std::cout << "Long : " << std::numeric_limits<long>::min() << std::endl;
    std::cout << "Long Long: " << std::numeric_limits<long long>::min() << std::endl;
    std::cout << "Float : " << std::numeric_limits<float>::min() << std::endl;
    std::cout << "Double : " << std::numeric_limits<double>::min() << std::endl;
}

Which outputs (on my machine):

Maximum values :
Short : 32767
Int : 2147483647
Long : 2147483647
Long Long: 9223372036854775807
Float : 3.40282e+038
Double : 1.79769e+308

Minimum Values: 
Short : -32768
Int : -2147483648
Long : -2147483648
Long Long: -9223372036854775808
Float : 1.17549e-038
Double : 2.22507e-308
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To be a more explicit, 2^64 ~ 10^19. You have roughly log(2^64) / log(10) = 19 digits in a long long. –  Mike Bantegui Sep 7 '12 at 17:43
    
@Rapptz IS long long supported by GCC+ 4.3.2 compiler? –  Abhishek Sep 7 '12 at 17:54
    
@Abhishek should be as seen here –  Rapptz Sep 7 '12 at 17:56
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