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Possible Duplicate:
Casting List<> of Derived class to List<> of base class

The title may not make good sense. See the code:

class Person {}

class Manager : Person {}

class PaymentCalculator<T> where T : Person
{
    public double Calculate(T person)
    {
        return 0;    // calculate and return
    }
}

class Calculators : List<PaymentCalculator<Person>>
{
    public Calculators()
    {
        this.Add(new PaymentCalculator<Person>());
        this.Add(new PaymentCalculator<Manager>());     // this doesn't work

        PassCalculator(new PaymentCalculator<Person>());
        PassCalculator(new PaymentCalculator<Manager>());   // this doesn't work
    }

    public void PassCalculator(PaymentCalculator<Person> x)
    { }
}

The two lines in the code marked as "this doesn't work" won't compile.

I can work around the issue, but it doesn't seem my intent is wrong. Or, is it?

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3  
this question gets asked way too often with way too many different variations. we need a "covariance does not work that way in C#" close reason :) –  Michael Edenfield Sep 7 '12 at 18:27
    
I like my question more than the other question! (Also I really like and appreciate the answer from Thomas and ie.) –  kennethc Sep 7 '12 at 18:40
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marked as duplicate by asawyer, Randolf R-F, Daniel Mann, Michael Edenfield, Servy Sep 7 '12 at 18:27

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Even though Manager inherits from Person, PaymentCalculator<Manager> doesn't inherit from PaymentCalculator<Person>. It would work if PaymentCalculator<T> was contravariant, but classes can't be contravariant in .NET (only interfaces and delegates can be contravariant).

A possible solution to your problem would be to declare a contravariant interface like this:

interface IPaymentCalculator<in T> // "in" means contravariant
{
    double Calculate(T person);
}

Make PaymentCalculator<T> implements the IPaymentCalculator<T> interface:

class PaymentCalculator<T> : IPaymentCalculator<T> where T : Person
{
    public double Calculate(T person)
    {
        return 0;    // calculate and return
    }
}

And make the Calculators class inherit from List<IPaymentCalculator<Person>>

class Calculators : List<IPaymentCalculator<Person>>

With these changes, it should work as you expect.

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That is right. "By default" new MyClass<Derived>() is not assignable to new MyClass<Base>(). But you can do the trick using co-variance of interfaces:

class Person { }

class Manager : Person { }

interface IPaymentCalculator<out T> where T : Person
{
}

class PaymentCalculator<T> : IPaymentCalculator<T> where T : Person
{
    public double Calculate(T person)
    {
        return 0;    // calculate and return
    }
}

class Calculators : List<IPaymentCalculator<Person>>
{
    public Calculators()
    {
        this.Add(new PaymentCalculator<Person>());
        this.Add(new PaymentCalculator<Manager>());     // this doesn't work

        PassCalculator(new PaymentCalculator<Person>());
        PassCalculator(new PaymentCalculator<Manager>());   // this doesn't work
    }

    public void PassCalculator(IPaymentCalculator<Person> x)
    { }
}

This will compile and work.

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1  
In this case it's contravariance, not covariance (I initially made the same mistake...) –  Thomas Levesque Sep 7 '12 at 18:32
    
BTW, we came up with the exact same solution... I'll leave my answer anyway because it gives more explanations ;) –  Thomas Levesque Sep 7 '12 at 18:34
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