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The proprietary software that we're using for backups (sadface) generates a series of images that we use rsync to sync over to an off-site location. The files generated look something like:

a.bak
b.bak
c.bak

So we sync those across and get exactly the same structure on the off-site machine. Then the backup program runs again and we get something like:

archive/a.bak
archive/b.bak
c.bak
d.bak
e.bak

So the rsync job runs and we end up with something like:

archive/a.bak
archive/b.bak
a.bak
b.bak
c.bak
d.bak
e.bak

Obviously, we would prefer the off-site machine to look like the on-site machine does, to avoid clutter and save on storage space. Is there any way to get rsync to mirror the moves that have happened on-site, or are we going to have to work out something outside of rsync?

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4 Answers 4

I don't know of any way to have it intelligently detect that the file has simply "moved". You can, however, use the --delete flag, so that it'll delete files from the destination that no longer exist on the source. The downside is that you'll re-copy the file whenever it moves, but at least you won't be wasting space for the old location on the destination anymore.

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1  
Rsync cannot detect moved files, since it doesn't maintain any state on either source or target. –  JesperE Aug 5 '09 at 10:38
1  
--delete-after is a good idea, also consider using --link-dest –  Hasturkun Aug 5 '09 at 11:16
2  
The data on the filesystem is all the state it would need. Rsync can already detect if content moves around within a file and handle that efficiently. (search for "rsync algorithm") I don't see why that couldn't be generalized to work across files in some future version of rsync. –  Laurence Gonsalves Aug 5 '09 at 11:19

If you use the --times switch and make sure both ends have clock syncing and then you can use --update and --delete options to only transfer newer files and prune away files that shouldn't be there.

See the rsync man page for full options.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

The solution we ended up going with was to write a script that works out the moves itself.

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2  
Could you please share that script? Thanks –  user1468142 Jun 20 '12 at 5:02

There is a very clever solution to this problem. It takes an extra bit of space, but it saves you from so much wasted traffic. I've found it in https://lincolnloop.com/blog/detecting-file-moves-renames-rsync/

See the details there, but basically, you make a hard-link backup tree before making any changes, on both sides, and then modify the original tree. When rsync'ing, you use an extra option to keep hard-links, and that's enough for rsync to detect the duplicate files and avoid copying them again.

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