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I have the following class which contains a hard coded URL that never changes:

    public class HttpClient {
        private final String DOWNLOAD_URL = "http://original.url.json";

        public String readJsonDataFromUrl() throws IOException {
            URLConnection urlConnection = getUrlConnection();

            BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(urlConnection.getInputStream()));
            StringBuffer content = new StringBuffer();

            String readLine = "";
            while ((readLine = reader.readLine()) != null)  {
                content.append(readLine);
            }

            return content.toString();
        }

        private URLConnection getUrlConnection() throws IOException {
            URL jsonLocator = new URL(DOWNLOAD_URL);

            return jsonLocator.openConnection();
        }
    }

Now imagine that I'd like to expect the IOException in my test. In my opinion, the only way to do that is to rewrite the complete class in a mock object because of the final variable:

public class HttpClientMock extends HttpClient  {
    private final String DOWNLOAD_URL = "http://wrong.test.url.json";

    @Override
    public String readJsonDataFromUrl() throws IOException {
        URLConnection urlConnection = getUrlConnection();

        BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(urlConnection.getInputStream()));
        StringBuffer content = new StringBuffer();

        String readLine = "";
        while ((readLine = reader.readLine()) != null)  {
            content.append(readLine);
        }

        return content.toString();
    }

    private URLConnection getUrlConnection() throws IOException {
        URL jsonLocator = new URL(DOWNLOAD_URL);
        URLConnection urlConnection = jsonLocator.openConnection();

        return urlConnection;
    }
}

But this is somehow far-fetched. If the original methods would be changed, the test results could still be positive because with this attempt, I don't actually test the original class anymore.

How can this be done properly? (I don't want to use a framework just for this one test, so are there any design attempts to solve this in a common way?)

share|improve this question
    
can you change the original code? – Imre L Sep 7 '12 at 19:03
    
Yes, but I don't want to make it less restrictive by making the private method protected or something. Or do you have any other ideas? – Bevor Sep 7 '12 at 19:08
2  
Return the download URL from a one line get method and pass it to the other methods in the class. You can test the other methods by passing bad URLs. – Gilbert Le Blanc Sep 7 '12 at 19:18
    
Good idea, could you post this as answer. If this works fine, I will accept your answer. – Bevor Sep 7 '12 at 19:21
1  
Making protected is actually opening up for changes not restricting. Able to write unit tests easy is a sign of a good design. However: stackoverflow.com/questions/4516381/… – Imre L Sep 7 '12 at 19:26

One of the challenges many people face when beginning test-driven development (or just dabbling in it) is writing code that is testable. An important idea behind this concept is writing discrete units of modular code that are easily testable and avoiding situations like the one above.

Rather than specifying a hard-coded value in the class definition you should accept it as a parameter and pass it in somewhere else. If you require this hard-coded value you can specify it as a static in the class definition and pass that in as the parameter when needed in production use.

public class HttpClient {
    public final String DEFAULT_URL = "http://original.url.json";

    public String readJsonDataFromUrl(String url) throws IOException {
        URLConnection urlConnection = getUrlConnection(url);

        BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(urlConnection.getInputStream()));
        StringBuffer content = new StringBuffer();

        String readLine = "";
        while ((readLine = reader.readLine()) != null)  {
            content.append(readLine);
        }

        return content.toString();
    }

    private URLConnection getUrlConnection(String url) throws IOException {
        URL jsonLocator = new URL(url);

        return jsonLocator.openConnection();
    }
}

...regular use case

public class SomeClass {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        HttpClient client = new HttpClient();
        String result = client.readJsonDataFromUrl(HttpClient.DEFAULT_URL);
    }
}

...and test your code like so:

public class HttpClientTest {
    // TODO expect exception
    @Test
    public void failDownload( ) {
        HttpClient client = new HttpClient();
        String result = client.readJsonDataFromUrl("wrong.url");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but I have the same concerns here as with jeff's solution. – Bevor Sep 7 '12 at 19:52
    
May I ask then why you would need to test against a malformed url if the url never changes? – Jordan White Sep 7 '12 at 19:54
    
The url is from a public (open data) source. If they decide to change the url, my url would be wrong from this time. – Bevor Sep 7 '12 at 19:57
    
Sorry but I am a bit confused as to how testing a malformed url will help you know if the url is no longer valid... wouldn't that require just testing the default url? – Jordan White Sep 7 '12 at 20:01
1  
This is even more reason to not hard-code a url value. Perhaps package the current working url by default and in the event of failure check your server for an update url to be stored in a configuration file for further connections. This avoids wasted network io to the invalidated url and your server, should they ever change it, in between compiles. – Jordan White Sep 7 '12 at 20:15

Another spin on Gilbert Le Blanc's suggestion, is to make the HttpClient totally ignorant of the URL by injecting it through the constructor.

 public class HttpClient {
   private final String url;

   public HttpClient(String url) { this.url = url; }

 }

You can hard code the URL (or read from a config) somewhere externally to HttpClient and inject it wherever you instantiate the client. Then in your test it will be trivial to inject a bad url.

share|improve this answer
    
I already thought about that but this would offer an unnecessary weak point. – Bevor Sep 7 '12 at 19:39
    
what weak point? – jeff Sep 7 '12 at 19:40
    
One could parse here any url, and this is absolutely not necessary since the url never changes. – Bevor Sep 7 '12 at 19:43
    
The fact that you want to test a bad url means that the url can change. An HttpClient should be able to read from a URL. Whatever URL it ends up reading from is a dependency. Testable systems allow you to inject dependencies. One of the main reasons for this is so you can inject mock components where needed. – jeff Sep 7 '12 at 20:04
    
I know what you mean, but see my explanation at Jordan White's posting. – Bevor Sep 7 '12 at 20:10
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Thanks to everybody, but I think that Gilbert Le Blanc's solution is the most preferable for that case which looks like this:

The original class:

public class HttpClient {
    private final String DOWNLOAD_URL = "http://my.original.json.url";

    public String readJsonDataFromUrl() throws IOException {
        URLConnection urlConnection = getUrlConnection();

        BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(urlConnection.getInputStream()));
        StringBuffer content = new StringBuffer();

        String readLine = "";
        while ((readLine = reader.readLine()) != null)  {
            content.append(readLine);
        }

        return content.toString();
    }

    private URLConnection getUrlConnection() throws IOException {
        URL jsonLocator = new URL(getConnectionString());

        return jsonLocator.openConnection();
    }

    protected String getConnectionString()  {
        return DOWNLOAD_URL;
    }
}

The mock object:

public class HttpClientMock extends HttpClient  {
    private String downloadUrl = "http://my.original.json.url";

    public HttpClientMock()  {
        super();
    }

    public HttpClientMock(String downloadUrl)  { 
        this.downloadUrl = downloadUrl;
    }

    @Override
    protected String getConnectionString()  {
        return downloadUrl;
    }
}

And the working tests:

public class HttpClientTest {

    private JSONParser jsonParser = new JSONParser();

    @Test
    public void readJsonDataFromUrlSucceeds() throws IOException, ParseException {
        HttpClient httpClient = new HttpClientMock();

        String jsonString = httpClient.readJsonDataFromUrl();
        JSONObject jsonObject = (JSONObject)jsonParser.parse(jsonString);

        assertTrue(jsonObject.size() > 0);
    }

    @Test(expected = IOException.class)
    public void readJsonDataFromMalformedUrlFails() throws IOException, ParseException {
        HttpClient httpClient = new HttpClientMock("http://malformed");

        httpClient.readJsonDataFromUrl();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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