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I have the following classes and interfaces:

public interface IThing
{
    string Name { get; }
}

public class Thing : IThing
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

public abstract class ThingConsumer<T> where T : IThing
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

Now, I have a factory that will return objects derived from ThingConsumer like:

public class MyThingConsumer : ThingConsumer<Thing>
{
}

My factory currently looks like this:

public static class ThingConsumerFactory<T> where T : IThing
{
    public static ThingConsumer<T> GetThingConsumer(){
        if (typeof(T) == typeof(Thing))
        {
            return new MyThingConsumer();
        }
        else
        {
            return null;
        }
    }
}

I'm getting tripped up with this error: Error 1 Cannot implicitly convert type 'ConsoleApplication1.MyThingConsumer' to 'ConsoleApplication1.ThingConsumer<T>'

Anyone know how to accomplish what I'm attempting here?

Thanks!

Chris

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2  
You shouldn't switching on types in generic code. Consider implementing the code for concrete types. –  nan Sep 7 '12 at 19:28
    
You don't need to check if T is of IThing if you have the where clause –  Cole Johnson Sep 7 '12 at 19:53
    
I'm a bit lost in all of the "Thing" type names. What is the end result you're trying to achieve? In other words, how are you planning to use this? –  phoog Sep 7 '12 at 20:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you make ThingConsumer<T> an interface rather than an abstract class, then your code will work as is.

public interface IThingConsumer<T> where T : IThing
{
    string Name { get; set; }
}

Edit

One more change needed. In ThingConsumerFactory, cast back to the return type IThingConsumer<T>:

return (IThingConsumer<T>)new MyThingConsumer();
share|improve this answer
    
Fantastic! I can't tell you how much more elegant my architecture is because of this tweak! Thanks! –  Mister Epic Sep 8 '12 at 23:41
    
To satisfy a point of curiosity, why is using an abstract class forbidden? I have always considered abstract and interfaces basically contracts, why is one valid in this context and not the other? –  Mister Epic Sep 8 '12 at 23:59
    
@ChrisHardie good question ... I think it's just a feature of the language, that variance is supported in interfaces, but not generally in classes. Remember, it's not right to think of abstract classes generally as contracts (even though they can be used that way), since they can include method bodies. On variance, this is a pretty good article: blogs.msdn.com/b/csharpfaq/archive/2010/02/16/… –  McGarnagle Sep 9 '12 at 0:49
    
@ChrisHardie I asked a question related to this, and got a good answer as to why it's possible to cast to interfaces but not abstract classes: stackoverflow.com/a/12335905/1001985 –  McGarnagle Sep 9 '12 at 1:47

The compiler is stumbling over the conversion from MyThingConsumer to ThingConsumer<T> even though T:IThing and MyThingConsumer:Thingconsumer<Thing> and Thing:IThing. Which is quite a few hoops for it to jump through!

The code works if you use return new MyThingConsumer() as ThingConsumer<T>; instead of a direct cast. You know the result will never be null, and the compiler is happy because it is guaranteed a return value of the right type at runtime.

Edit: Here is the full code I used for testing (in Snippy):

public interface IThing
{
    string Name { get; }
}

public class Thing : IThing
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

public abstract class ThingConsumer<T> where T : IThing
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

public class MyThingConsumer : ThingConsumer<Thing>
{
}

public static class ThingConsumerFactory<T> where T : IThing
{
    public static ThingConsumer<T> GetThingConsumer()
    {
        if (typeof(T) == typeof(Thing))
        {
            return new MyThingConsumer() as ThingConsumer<T>;
        }
        else
        {
            return null;
        }
    }
}

...

var thing = ThingConsumerFactory<Thing>.GetThingConsumer();
Console.WriteLine(thing);
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The compiler is stumbling because the conversion is not allowed. First, ThingConsumer<Thing> is not convertible to ThingConsumer<IThing>, even if Thing implements IThing. Second, even if we were talking about covariance, it would only work if Thing were convertible to T, but it isn't. They implement the same interface, but one is not convertible to the other any more than a LinkedList<string> is convertible to a Dictionary<int, Guid> just because they both implement IEnumerable. –  phoog Sep 7 '12 at 20:33
    
@phoog But Thing is convertible to T on the line with the cast, because it is a T. –  Matthew Strawbridge Sep 7 '12 at 20:47
    
With public abstract class ThingConsumer<T> where T : IThing { public string Name { get; set; } } and public class MyThingConsumer<T> : ThingConsumer<T> { } I still get the error: The type 'T' cannot be used as type parameter 'T' in the generic type or method ThingConsumer<T>'. There is no boxing conversion or type parameter conversion from 'T' to '.IThing'. –  Mister Epic Sep 8 '12 at 23:24
    
@ChrisHardie Sorry, my previous comment at the end of my answer was wrong. It should be public class MyThingConsumer : ThingConsumer<Thing>{ }. I've updated my answer with the full code I used. –  Matthew Strawbridge Sep 9 '12 at 7:55
    
@MatthewStrawbridge Yes, if the compiler were to track the logic and notice that we've called GetType() on an object of type T and that this result is in fact equal to Thing, it could allow the conversion in the scope of the if branch. But the compiler doesn't do that; generic type logic is independent of run-time flow analysis. The compiler's flow analysis is pretty limited, anyway; it's mostly concerned with definite assignment and reachability. Eric Lippert has written on why this is so; the short answer is that the benefit of adding this to the compiler doesn't outweigh the cost. –  phoog Sep 10 '12 at 16:39

You need to define your class like this I believe:

public class MyThingConsumer<Thing> : ThingConsumer

The reason is that ThingConsumer is already typed in its definition with this: where T : IThing

Now, you can make the call return new MyThingConsumer<T>();.

This should in turn match the expected return type of ThingConsumer<T>

EDIT

Sorry for the confusion, here is what should work:

public class MyThingConsumer<T> : ThingConsumer<T> where T : IThing

and

return new MyThingConsumer<T>();
share|improve this answer
    
And then I get the error: The type 'Thing' cannot be used as type parameter 'T' in the generic type or method 'ConsoleApplication1.ThingConsumer<T>'. There is no boxing conversion or type parameter conversion from 'Thing' to 'ConsoleApplication1.IThing'. –  Mister Epic Sep 7 '12 at 19:25
    
@ChrisHardie - See edits. –  Travis J Sep 7 '12 at 19:30
    
And here is the crux: I need MyThingConsumer to be coupled with a type that implements IThing, not the IThing interface. So while your suggestion does indeed compile, it doesn't quite do what I need it to do. But interesting code to look at! –  Mister Epic Sep 8 '12 at 23:41

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