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I've been experimenting with a class that does pattern matching. My class looks something like this:

class Matcher(object):
  def __init__(self, pattern):
    self._re = re.compile(pattern)

  def match(self, value):
    return self._re.match(value)

All told, my script takes ~45 seconds to run. As an experiment, I changed my code to:

class Matcher(object):
  def __init__(self, pattern):
    self._re = re.compile(pattern)
    self.match = self._re.match

A run of this script took 37 seconds. No matter how many times I repeat this process, I see the same significant boost in performance. Running it through cProfile shows something like this:

   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
 46100979   14.356    0.000   14.356    0.000 {method 'match' of '_sre.SRE_Pattern' objects}
 44839409    9.287    0.000   20.031    0.000 matcher.py:266(match)

Why on earth is the match method adding 9.2 seconds onto the run time? The most frustrating part is that I tried to recreate a simple case and was not able to do so. What am I missing here? My simple test case had a bug! Now it mimics the behavior I am seeing:

import re
import sys
import time

class X(object):
  def __init__(self):
    self._re = re.compile('.*a')

  def match(self, value):
    return self._re.match(value)

class Y(object):
  def __init__(self):
    self._re = re.compile('ba')
    self.match = self._re.match

inp = 'ba'
x = X()
y = Y()

sys.stdout.write("Testing with a method...")
sys.stdout.flush()
start = time.time()
for i in range(100000000):
  m = x.match(inp)
end = time.time()
sys.stdout.write("Done: "+str(end-start)+"\n")

sys.stdout.write("Testing with an attribute...")
sys.stdout.flush()
start = time.time()
for i in range(100000000):
  m = y.match(inp)
end = time.time()
sys.stdout.write("Done: "+str(end-start)+"\n")

Output:

$ python speedtest.py 
Testing with a method...Done: 50.6646981239
Testing with an attribute...Done: 35.5526258945

For reference, both are much faster with pyp, but still show significant gains when running with an atribute instead of a method:

$ pypy speedtest.py 
Testing with a method...Done: 6.15996003151
Testing with an attribute...Done: 3.57215714455
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I'm curious as to why you bother to wrap this in a class. Is it just to cache the compiled pattern? It seems like overkill. Doing Matcher = re.compile instead of creating this class would have the same effect, no? –  Steven Rumbalski Sep 7 '12 at 19:45
    
@StevenRumbalski this class actually has a lot more functionality. I'm only showing one, peformance affecting, piece. It'd be more useful, in this case, if it simply returned True or False. I have actually tried substituting a few different pattern matching algorithms in place of the regex. –  dave mankoff Sep 7 '12 at 19:50
    
I don't see any properties in your code... –  kindall Sep 7 '12 at 20:14
    
For those wondering, what @kindall means to express is that, in Python, properties and attributes refer to different things. Whereas in many languages, the distinction is fuzzy or even meaningless, Python reserves the word property for a dynamic language feature that allows one to transparently use getters, setters, and deleters. An attribute, what I am actually using above, refers to a simple static object member. –  dave mankoff Sep 7 '12 at 20:32
1  
I was also mislead by your use of the term 'properties'. Not trying to be obnoxious, but given that you're asking a question about Python specifically and that you acknowledge using the term 'properties' is misleading in a Python context, why would you not edit your question to use the less misleading terminology? –  JS. Sep 8 '12 at 0:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

It's probably mostly the overhead of the additional function call. Calling a Python function is relatively expensive performance wise, because of the need to set up an additional stack frame, etc. Here is a bare-bones example that demonstrates similar performance:

>>> timeit.timeit("f()", "g = (lambda: 1); f = lambda: g()")
0.2858083918486847
>>> timeit.timeit("f()", "f = lambda: 1")
0.13749289364989004

There is also the additional cost of doing two extra attribute lookups inside your method: looking up _re on self, then looking up match on that _re object. However, this is likely a smaller component since dictionary lookups are pretty fast in Python. (My timeit example above shows pretty poor performance even when there is only one extra name lookup in the double-call version.)

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(+1) Nice answer -- better than mine :). –  mgilson Sep 7 '12 at 19:38
    
And it's not just the function call. As dis will confirm, there are actually several bytecode operations even for simple delegation. Those have to be interpreted. –  delnan Sep 7 '12 at 19:39
    
Can the vm not optimize this in any meaningful way automatically? I am not sold on the idea of exposing regex.match directly, but that's a huge performance hit that I'd like to avoid. –  dave mankoff Sep 7 '12 at 19:39
3  
@davemankoff A tracing JIT compiler inlines code like this for breakfast, so give PyPy a try. But CPython, which I assume you mean by "the vm", cannot optimize this. It's a simple interpreter -- a rather optimized one, but still an interpreter. –  delnan Sep 7 '12 at 19:43
    
@davemankoff: It's difficult to optimize in general because of Python's dynamic nature. For instance, you could later do self._re = someOtherObject, and then self._re.match would no longer be the same as directly calling match on the regular expression object. PyPy does do this by tracing actual execution paths and optimizing them, but it may not be suitable for a real application since it doesn't work out of the box with Python extensions written in C. –  BrenBarn Sep 7 '12 at 19:44

The first version is an extra function call each time. That incurs some overhead.

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